Frequently Asked Questions

Below you will find answers from British Land to the questions most commonly asked about the Canada Water Masterplan. They include up to date information on the project background, key areas of interest, planning application and next steps. These are frequently reviewed and updated as required. If you have a question that is not covered here, please get in touch.

What is the vision for the Canada Water Masterplan and what will be delivered?

The Canada Water Masterplan is a partnership between British Land, Southwark Council and the local community to create a new town centre for Southwark and London that complements the local area, making an active, positive, long-term contribution to local life.

 

The Masterplan covers 53 acres providing jobs, homes, offices, shops, public spaces and facilities and responds to the Greater London Authority (GLA) and Southwark Council’s policy aspirations to deliver new homes and jobs at Canada Water. It is a 15 year project and British Land is here for the long term. Building on our efforts to date, we will actively invest, be part of local community life and be a good neighbour.

 

Recognising what already makes the area special and responding to the area’s rich heritage, the Masterplan will provide new opportunities and benefits for those people who live and work in the area now and in the future.

 

Since 2014 we have conducted extensive consultation on the Masterplan with the local community. We have received feedback on a wide range of issues including housing, town centre uses, impact on local facilities, the new routes and streets, transport and jobs and training. All of this has directly informed and changed the plans that we are bringing forward.

 

These new homes, offices, shops, public spaces and facilities will link with the existing community physically and socially, and ensure that the Masterplan is incorporated as a part of the wider local area.

What are the benefits for local people?

The Canada Water Masterplan will build on what makes the area special by providing new opportunities for people who live, work, study, and spend time in Canada Water, Rotherhithe and Surrey Docks.

 

There will be a range of new public facilities such as a leisure centre potential for a cinema, GP surgery and new sixth form, community use space, and space for a police hub.

 

We will also be creating 12 acres of new open spaces and places for everyone to enjoy including a major new 3.5 acre park, the first new high street in London for 100 years and 16 new streets (covering 3.8km). The public realm will include play and activities for all ages.

 

The Masterplan will deliver approximately 3,000 new homes, with a minimum of 35% being affordable, with 70% of these homes available at social rent and 30% intermediate affordable.

 

The Masterplan will be home to c.20,000 jobs upon completion, and our S106 agreement (and Social Regeneration Charter) captures ambitions to support local residents to access the employment opportunities created in both construction and at end use, recognising that some people will require more support than others.

 

Over the life of the project we will deliver programmes with our partners to deliver bespoke employment and training programmes for local people to access career, employment and business opportunities in construction, offices and shops, as well as apprenticeships. We’ve already piloted projects aimed at getting people ready for employment with Tree Shepherd and other partners.

 

The proposals also include affordable workspace and retail space at subsidised rents prioritised for local businesses.

 

We’re committed to ensuring that the proposals connect with and into the surrounding area and community, so that it addresses social, economic and health priorities across the area.

Who is British Land?

We are a Real Estate Investment Trust (REIT); this means we are long-term investors in the places which we operate. We actively manage, finance and develop high-quality environments throughout the UK that enhance the area and support local jobs and skills.

 

We are committed to working closely with Southwark Council, local residents and other key stakeholders to deliver a new town centre for Canada Water which we intend to own, manage and maintain for the long-term.

 

We have been involved in the Canada Water area for many years and support a number of local community organisations and charities; to date we have invested over £400,000 in local community projects and initiatives since 2014, as well as providing volunteers, work experience, and pro-bono support to a range of local projects. More information can be found here.

Who are the project team?

British Land has commissioned an experienced project team to draw together all the skills necessary to deliver a successful masterplan.

 

The lead masterplanners are a Southwark based company, Allies and Morrison, alongside planning consultants DP9 and landscape architects, Townshend. There are a wide range of other consultants involved due to the size of the project. Visit our Who We Are page for more information.

Why is the area being developed?

In planning policy, the Greater London Authority (GLA) has defined the area between Surrey Quays and Canada Water as an ‘Opportunity Area’ and Housing Zone which designates it as one of London’s key growth areas, providing significant news homes and jobs. Southwark Council’s Local Plan and the Canada Water Area Action Plan also support the regeneration of the area and set out the Council’s vision and aspirations.

What is the relationship between British Land and Southwark Council?

We work with Southwark as both regeneration partners, and as a local planning authority on the planning application. We acquired the long leasehold of the Surrey Quays Shopping Centre site and the Printworks site and the freehold of the Surrey Quays Leisure Park site, the Dock Offices and the former Rotherhithe Police Station over several years. Southwark Council holds the freehold for the majority of the Surrey Quays Shopping Centre site and the Printworks site.

 

Through the regeneration partnership we have entered into a Master Development Agreement (MDA) with Southwark Council. The MDA is an umbrella agreement which sets out the obligations and responsibilities of both parties to allow the coordinated development of the Masterplan site. The MDA regularises the different land ownerships held by us and by Southwark Council through the Council granting a new 500 year lease to us for the whole site, with the Council remaining as freeholder. The Council has a 20% interest in the Masterplan site and an option to invest in individual development plots or to sell out its interest. This arrangement is intended to enable the Council to generate income from the scheme which would be used to support the delivery of local services.

 

We have also been working with Southwark to develop a Social Regeneration Charter for Canada Water, which sets out a framework for local social and economic priorities for the local area.

 

Separately, Southwark Council is the local planning authority and granted planning permission for the Canada Water Masterplan in  May 2020.

What sites do British Land own and how will this change?

British Land currently owns the freehold or long leasehold for the entire Masterplan site (with Southwark Council retaining the freehold on some parts of the site). The area covers Surrey Quays Shopping Centre, Surrey Quays Leisure Park, the Printworks, the historical Dock Office Courtyard and the former Rotherhithe Police Station. British Land also own the Dock Offices and Dock Managers’ Office, however these buildings sit outside of the planning application boundary.

 

We have entered into a Master Development Agreement (MDA) with Southwark Council. The MDA is an umbrella agreement which sets out the obligations and responsibilities of both parties to allow the coordinated development of the Masterplan site.

 

The Council has a 20% interest in the Masterplan site and an option to invest in individual development plots or to sell out its interest, meaning the ownership structure could change.

 

The MDA also allows British Land to take on the management responsibilities for Deal Porters Square and Red Bridge Square by Greenland Dock, to ensure a uniform, high quality and integrated management regime that seamlessly blends into the Masterplan area. These areas will continue to be owned by Southwark Council but managed by us.

Has British Land undertaken something similar before?

The British Land team has great experience in delivering other long-term, large scale regeneration projects.

 

Our track record can already been seen across our development portfolio, including at our 13-acre Regent’s Place campus, which is home to over 20,000 workers and residents.

 

Leading the Canada Water Masterplan are Emma Cariaga and Roger Madelin CBE. Emma comes with huge experience of delivering large scale regeneration projects in London, having held a number of development and land management roles at companies of a similar size to British Land, including Landsec, Barratt and Crest Nicholson.

 

Roger meanwhile was a Director at Argent from 1989 and CEO from 1997. During his time there he was responsible for delivering Argent’s 67 acre King’s Cross development, as well as all other developments including Green Park and Thames Valley Park in Reading, Brindleyplace in Birmingham, Piccadilly in Manchester and office buildings in the City of London.

What are Section 106 commitments and where can I find the commitments made for the Canada Water Masterplan?

A Section 106 agreement is a planning obligation that is agreed between local authorities, in this case Southwark Council and Transport for London, and the developer (British Land). It is a legally binding agreement that sets out the infrastructure, facilities and wider benefits we will deliver, including the levels of affordable housing, planned transport improvements, and our support for local employment, education and discounted retail and workspace.

 

Each commitment will be provided at the appropriate time throughout the lifetime of the project, which we expect could take 15 years to complete, to meet future needs.

 

The Section 106 Agreement can be viewed on Southwark Council’s Planning Register, and more information on what it commits us to be delivered can be found here.

3.1. THE SITE & EXISTING FACILITIES
What will happen to Surrey Quays Shopping Centre and the existing shops?

Our intention is that the shopping centre will remain open during the construction of the first detailed plots.

 

The development of the Masterplan will mean that over a period of time, and over several phases, Surrey Quays Shopping Centre would be demolished and replaced completely with a mixed-use town centre including a new High Street and public spaces with a greater range of shops and facilities.

 

We’re also working with Tesco to provide a similar sized replacement store with continuous trading.

 

We recognise that Surrey Quays Shopping Centre provides a local shopping amenity, so we will endeavour to maintain retail provision throughout the development phases.

What will happen to Tesco and the petrol filling station?

We’re in constructive discussions with Tesco about building a brand new store of a similar size, timed in a way that would allow uninterrupted trading and customer service. Moving the existing store will open up a new link to Greenland Dock. Parking will also be provided on site and new homes would be provided above the relocated store. To allow for the construction of Plot A2 an interim petrol filling station will be delivered alongside the first detailed plots. See question 3.5 for further details.

What will happen to the Surrey Quays Leisure Park and the current activities there?

In the short term, the intention is to retain the amenities at Surrey Quays Leisure Park. In the longer term the site would be redeveloped and leisure and restaurant uses would be provided as part of the wider masterplan. The Masterplan application includes provision of around 50,000sqm of leisure (D2) floorspace, which includes the reprovision of a cinema of a similar size.

What will happen to existing jobs in the shopping centre and leisure park?

The shopping centre and leisure park are not in the area where the first detailed plots (A1, A2, K1 and the Interim Petrol Filling Station) would be constructed and they will continue to operate as they currently do until further phases are brought forward.

 

The first detailed plots that will be brought forward will include a significant amount of workspace, as well as retail and food units, delivering employment uses early in the Masterplan’s delivery. A phased approach to the development of the later phases of the Masterplan will allow for elements of the retail and leisure offer to continue or move to a new location as the phasing is determined in detail, allowing jobs to transfer to new locations, or generating new local employment opportunities for people to move to. Tesco will continue to trade continuously, only closing their existing store once the new one is open for trading.

 

Overall the Masterplan will provide up to 100,000 sq m of retail, leisure, entertainment and community space – more than three times the size of the existing Surrey Quays Shopping Centre, generating c.2,000 jobs, plus.

What will happen to the Dock Offices and the existing tenants?

The Dock Offices will be retained and their surroundings enhanced. The design team have focused on how the Masterplan public realm can provide an improved setting for this important piece of the dock heritage, and alongside construction of the first detailed plots the dock office courtyard will be enhanced with a new community square. The status of the tenants within the building will remain unchanged.

What are the long-term plans for the Printworks? Will the cultural/ arts/ music events remain?

The Printworks has been brought into an exciting temporary use as a multidisciplinary events space whilst plans for the wider Masterplan are developed. Its temporary planning use is for up to five years from 2016. The Masterplan retains the flexibility to retain the Printworks and repurpose the press hall for a range of potential uses or facilitate a redevelopment to provide homes and workspace. Discussions with potential occupiers for a retained print-hall are ongoing. The planning application allows for both options.

Why did British Land purchase the former Rotherhithe Police Station? What will happen to it?

In March 2018 we completed the acquisition of the former Rotherhithe police station. This followed the Metropolitan Police’s operational decision to close the facility and dispose of the asset in 2014, after which we were successful in acquiring the site in an open bidding process. We’re pleased that the site can now be integrated into the Masterplan area and will engage on its future in due course.

 

In December 2018, the Artists Studio Company (ASC) took on a lease of the building, which will secure the use of the site.

 

ASC is a registered charity and artists workspace provider. The organisation will offer workspace to artists, as well as holding a number of free public art exhibitions during its occupancy. For more information on the building’s temporary occupiers, please visit: http://www.ascstudios.co.uk.

What is happening to the green space next to the Prince of Orange Walkway?

Following public consultation and feedback, the green space next to Prince of Orange Walkway will be retained and managed. Planting will be chosen to ensure year-round foliage cover at the appropriate levels, and both the type of planting and its maintenance regime will be subject to a planning condition. We have been working with partners such as Global Generation in order to consider the most appropriate future for the space in consultation with local residents.

Is the land being developed off Canada Street and Quebec Way part of the Canada Water Masterplan?

No – the land that is being developed off Canada Street and Quebec Way is owned by Scape, who are bringing forward a separate scheme that is not part of the Canada Water Masterplan.

3.2. COMMUNITY, LEGACY AND THE SOCIAL REGENERATION CHARTER
How is British Land working with/supporting existing local groups?

We’re long-term investors in the Canada Water area, and our local investment aims to ensure that the local community benefits from our activities and presence in the area. We provide funding, volunteers and pro-bono advice and support via Surrey Quays Shopping Centre and directly from British Land and the Canada Water Masterplan consultant team. For the latter, we focus on projects which link people to the opportunities the Masterplan will create and projects with an emphasis on becoming self-sustaining. We’re already working with a broad range of local groups and organisations, more details can be found on the Local Investment page of our website.

 

We also seek to volunteer with local organisations, partnering on meaningful projects. This could be a day working on an idea or physical project, or longer term for example as trustees, governors or advisors, enabling local groups to grow. Through our work we’ve grown strong links with a range of local community organisations and charities, which we intend to build on. To date we’ve invested over £400,000 directly in local community projects alongside further [additional] pro-bono support and advice directly and from our consultant team. As a business, British Land recognises the importance of investing in our local communities and has a strong track record here. We have been recognised with the Queen’s Award for Sustainability.

 

We invest in projects which make a positive contribution to the local area; in Canada Water this means we focus on Surrey Quays and Rotherhithe wards. We also only fund projects that contribute to the delivery on our legacy and are connected to the project.

 

We also recognise the very material impact that Covid-19 is having locally and are also committed to supporting the local community at this challenging time. More information on our response can be found here.

 

To enquire about a community investment idea, please contact team@canadawater.mc-staging.net. Funding requests are considered by British Land and the Canada Water Community Investment Committee as appropriate, in line with our guidance.

What is the Social Regeneration Charter?

In Autumn 2017 we started working on a Social Regeneration Charter for Canada Water, initiated by Southwark Council and building on what was then called our Legacy Strategy. The Charter approach aims to ensure that the Masterplan delivers holistic and wide-ranging benefits that the community really wants to see through an evidenced-based, partnership approach with the Council, local community, and potentially other stakeholders in future. The charter framework and Southwark’s subsequent Place Action Plan priorities (as approved by Cabinet in December 2018) were informed by a range of local input and research, including detailed socio-economic baseline research undertaken by Social Life in late 2017-18.

 

The charter sits outside of the planning process, however an outline charter was submitted in support of the planning application and can be viewed here.

 

Following Southwark Council’s decision to approve the outline planning application in September 2019, we will continue to work with the Council to develop the next stages of the Social Regeneration Charter as we move into the delivery phase of the project.

How can local people stay involved in the creation of the Social Regeneration Charter?

Continued local input and review is a core part of the Social Regeneration Charter approach. As a next step we will be working with Southwark Council and the local community to establish an ongoing approach for local community involvement and input.

How can local people help ensure that opportunities and benefits created by the Masterplan reflect the real needs of the community?

As long-term owners in Canada Water we are committed to ensuring that our work and presence benefits the existing, and future, community.

 

We will continue to be active, contactable, and visible by engaging directly with neighbours and the wider community through meetings, events, newsletters, notice boards or other means.

 

We will also undertake, as part of future Reserved Matters Applications (RMAs), in-depth consultation on the plans for key areas such as the park and the dock, as well as via the Social Regeneration Charter.

 

In addition, we will explore how the community can be involved in shaping the delivery and management of the Masterplan, and will work with our local partners, including community groups and local Tenant and Resident Associations (TRAs), to ensure that communication is being done in the best way possible.

How can you ensure the benefits of the Masterplan as set out in the ‘Our Local Commitments’ section of the website are delivered?

The benefits of the Masterplan will be achieved through a variety of means: through being embedded in planning and design; as part of our development agreement with Southwark Council; through Section 106 planning obligations (which form a legally binding agreement), Community Infrastructure Levy funding and planning conditions; through programmes and initiatives alongside residents, occupiers and our consultants; and, finally, through the way the site is managed.

 

Our Local Commitments  are largely captured within the Section 106 agreement, a legally binding agreement between Southwark Council, Transport for London and British Land  which commits us to deliver on the elements set out, in line with specific timings and trigger points captured within the document. In May 2020, this document was formally agreed.

 

There will be regular and transparent updates on our delivery against these and our other stated commitments via our website and local communications throughout the duration of the project so stakeholders are aware of progress and can hold us to account.

 

In addition, we have been working jointly with Southwark Council on the Social Regeneration Charter and are committed to continue to work with them and the local community to deliver the Charter priorities for Canada Water. As part of the ongoing management of the Charter we will provide updates on the Masterplan’s success in delivering against the ambitions and values, with regular reporting and local input into priorities.

3.3. HOUSING & AFFORDABLE HOUSING
How many new homes (and new residents) will there be in the Canada Water Masterplan?

The illustrative Masterplan shows we could deliver around 3,000 new homes. 35% of homes will be affordable, split 70% social rent housing and 30% intermediate affordable housing, which is policy compliant.

 

Six out of every 10 of these affordable homes will be two or more bedrooms, so suitable for families.

 

This would mean a population of around 5,000 people, depending on the type, size and number of new homes which come forward as part of the Masterplan (the Masterplan applies for a range of uses which could result in different ratios of new homes to workspace).

 

The Opportunity Area status as set out in the London Plan requires the Canada Water area (which includes sites outside of the Canada Water Masterplan) to deliver at least 3,300 new homes and Southwark Council’s Canada Water Area Action Plan a minimum of 4,500 new homes by 2026.

What type of housing are you proposing?

In order to create a mixed community and respond to the changing needs of people over the next 15 years, 35% of homes across the Masterplan will be affordable, split 70% social rented housing and 30% intermediate affordable housing, which is policy compliant.

 

Six out of every 10 of these affordable homes will be two or more bedrooms, so suitable for families.

 

We anticipate that within these tenures and in the wider housing offer, we can deliver a range of different homes and tenures for different ages, incomes and life stages. We are also exploring the opportunity to build homes that are specifically designed for people at different life stages, including extra care and specialist accommodation, both for private and affordable tenures.

Will there be Affordable Housing? If so, how much and what type?

Yes, we recognise how important it is that we provide homes, including affordable homes that support local community needs.

 

We are committing to delivering 35% affordable homes across the Masterplan. The 35% affordable housing provision will provide a policy compliant mix of affordable housing with 70% Social Rented housing (in line with Southwark Council’s Rent Standard) and 30% Intermediate affordable housing (in line with the income caps set by the Greater London Authority).

 

All of the social rent homes will be let at rates specified by Southwark Council. At present this means that prices will start at £107 per week for a one bedroom flat. Two bed homes at £126 per week and three beds at £146 per week.

 

As part of the Master Development Agreement (MDA) between British Land and Southwark Council, the Council will have the first option to purchase the social rented homes and let them as council homes, at council rents, on council tenancies. The Council will also have the option to purchase social rented homes in all other phases of the scheme.

 

265 homes will be delivered in the first phase of development. Of these new homes, 87 will be affordable (including 60 at social rent).

Will local people get first choice of housing?

We have committed to a Local Lettings Agreement which will prioritise a proportion of affordable homes for qualifying local residents.

How many affordable homes will be for families?

Six out of every ten (or 60%) of all affordable homes being delivered will be two bedrooms or more and so suitable for families.

How will you limit overseas investors?

We want people to live at the site to create a genuinely mixed and balanced community and an active location. We hope the place will appeal to local, London and wider audiences and the mix of housing proposed supports this ambition.

 

British Land backs the Mayor’s Homes for Londoners initiative so that new homes are marketed to local people before, or at the same time as overseas.

What if I am interested in living in the Canada Water Masterplan?

We will be providing more information on how we intend to market both the homes for sale and for rent in the near future. Southwark Council will also decide how the affordable elements are allocated. If you’re interested in living in the Canada Water Masterplan, we would be delighted to hear from you and will add your details to a database for future reference. Please email team@canadawater.mc-staging.net.

3.4. TOWN CENTRE USES
What types of shops, food / drink and entertainment will there be?

The Masterplan will create an exciting new town centre at the heart of a thriving local economy and community. We estimate that the proposals have the potential to see c. £100m additional a year spent in the local area by bringing new jobs, businesses and investment to Canada Water.

 

Our vision is to deliver an improved shopping/food and drink offer which will suit a range of budgets, including independent retailers and high street chains, both large and small. The masterplan includes a replacement Tesco store of a similar size, a new leisure centre and a new cinema. An enlivenment and events programme, to build upon the vibrancy of the area, will be implemented.

 

Across the Masterplan there will be one million sq ft of retail, leisure, entertainment and community space – over three times the size of the existing Surrey Quays retail, generating around 2,000 net additional jobs, plus:

  • A mix of independent and larger retailers and leisure to suit different incomes, interests and life stages.
  • Allocating approximately 5,000 sq m of retail space will be available at discounted rent levels for 10 years, with incentives to support business growth.
  • Working with Tesco to provide a brand new similar sized replacement store with continuous trading.

 

A commitment to growing local skills and supporting residents to access new employment opportunities. We will deliver employment and training programmes to help local residents to access the job opportunities created.

How will you ensure there is a mix of both independent and high street outlets?

It is our aspiration that independent shops and restaurants will be able to flourish side-by-side with major brands and retailers in the Masterplan. As such, there will be 5,000 sq m of retail space available for 10 years, with incentives to support business growth.

 

In addition, we’re also proposing to establish a local business forum for new and existing businesses, helping support their activities, network and provide access to discounted workspace, as well as training opportunities.

Is there demand for additional outlets? How will British Land avoid vacant units?

The Masterplan will create an exciting new town centre at the heart of a thriving local economy and community. We estimate that the proposals have the potential to see nearly £100m a year spent in the local area by bringing new jobs, businesses and investment to Canada Water.

 

We also bring substantial experience of managing space, as one of the UK’s largest retail landlords. Our retail strategy will seek to attract a broad range of outlets which complement the existing facilities in the Canada Water area. A Retail and Leisure Statement has been submitted alongside the planning application and can be viewed here.

3.5. BUSINESS SUPPORT
How will the new town centre work with existing retailers and local high streets such as Lower Road / Albion Street? How will existing local businesses be supported?

We’re committed to contributing to a thriving local community and economy well beyond the Masterplan boundary.

 

The local high streets – namely Lower Road and Albion Street but also many more pockets around the area – are important local assets and our intention is to support the places and businesses to grow and benefit from the changes and investment which the Masterplan will bring.  We have spoken to traders on neighbouring high streets (both through surveys and holding drop in sessions to understand their aspirations and concerns for the future, and how we can best support a thriving local community and economy.

 

Part of our strategy involves creating physical connections between the existing retail areas and the Masterplan – e.g. from the new High Street to Lower Road. This will help ensure that they benefit from the potential £100m a year that we estimate will be spent in the local area by bringing new jobs, businesses and investment to Canada Water as part of the Masterplan. We have previously invested in local events and initiatives to support the local high streets – from music programmes to highlighting free parking at Surrey Quays shopping centre.

 

We will be supporting local businesses to access space by allocating 7,000 sq m available at 75% of market rent for 15 years

– that’s providing space for around 500 people. We will also provide 5,000 sq m of retail space available for 10 years, with incentives to support business growth.

 

In addition, we will set up a Local Business Network and Business Advisory Group, to support businesses that may be affected by the development either due to the need for the business to relocate or due to any disruption that may be caused as a result of construction activity. The Social Regeneration Charter includes a specific focus on supporting local businesses to grow.

What will happen to the existing businesses in the Dock Offices?

The listed Dock Office buildings will continue to provide opportunities for new and existing tenants. The status of existing tenants will remain unchanged.

Can I apply for commercial space in the Masterplan?

It will be some time before commercial space becomes available, however if you’re interested in registering for updates on future commercial space in the Masterplan, please contact us at team@canadawater.mc-staging.net.

3.6. CAREERS AND TRAINING
What type of jobs will be created, how many and what type?

The completed Masterplan will create up to 320,000 sq m of workspace accommodating c.20,000 jobs in the retail, leisure, hospitality and office-based sectors.

 

Some of these jobs will be new to the area, having moved from elsewhere, while some will be created. Employment opportunities will also be created in the construction phase. We expect the masterplan to deliver employment and career opportunities across a range of sectors and skill levels, however it is impossible to say now exactly what those jobs might look like or who they would be with.

 

Our Section 106 agreement includes targets for the number of Southwark residents supported into work, and we will work with our construction contractors and end-use occupiers to understand what skills they need, in order to be able to help support residents to access forthcoming opportunities. We will run training programmes to support people into these.

 

In the first phase of the development, there will be career and training opportunities for Southwark and local residents in construction roles, with training courses and opportunities to gain apprentice/NVQ-level qualifications, as well as roles within the new offices, retail and estate management which will accommodate around 2,300 permanent jobs.

 

Our focus will be on supporting those from the local area to be able to access these opportunities.

Will local people have access to new jobs? What support will be available to match job opportunities with local people?

Yes. The development will bring employment and career opportunities for local people of all ages and across a range of sectors and skill levels and we will work with our construction contractors and future occupiers to open up opportunities and recruitment, and plan appropriate support for residents to help in gaining the new roles.

 

In the first phase of the development, there will be career and training opportunities for Southwark and local residents in construction roles, with training courses and opportunities to gain apprentice/NVQ-level qualifications, as well as roles within the new offices, retail and estate management which will accommodate around 2,300 permanent jobs.

 

Our focus will be on supporting those from the local area to be able to access these opportunities.

 

We intend to:

  • Establish a Development Exploratory Centre to engage local schools and young people in careers in the built environment.
  • Set up a local business forum for new and existing businesses, helping support their activities, providing access to discounted workspace, as well as training opportunities.
  • Continue our community investment with an increased focus on supporting the health and wellbeing of local residents.
  • Ensure the public spaces and places welcome all local residents, and provide events and activities that appeal to all ages, abilities, incomes and interests, for example with big screens for major sporting events.
  • Continue to work with Southwark Council and the local community to deliver the Social Regeneration Charter and Action Plan priorities for Canada Water.
  • Increase the number of internships and paid work experience over the next 15 years and specifically encourage our future office, retail and leisure occupiers to provide internships, mentoring and education and employment programmes, alongside providing sector specific training.
3.7. STREETS & SPACES
What public spaces and routes are proposed in the Masterplan? Where can I find out more?

Once complete, a minimum of 35% of the overall Masterplan will be public open space. This includes 12 acres of new open spaces and places for all ages to enjoy, including a 3.5 acre park (equivalent in size to two football pitches), the first new high street in London for decades and 16 new streets (covering 3.8km).

 

Most routes within the Masterplan are pedestrian and cycle-focused. This includes a new pedestrian route from Lower Road to the High Street and a green link between Russia Dock Woodland and Southwark Park, which will be integrated with space for activities and play. Creating various level changes and diversifying the planting, will help create a range of types of public spaces, including quieter areas. More information is available in the Masterplan Design and Access statement which can be viewed in the Detailed Application section on the Planning Application page.

 

As part of the construction of the first detailed plots, we will  improve the landscaping around the Dock Offices courtyard, replant and redesign the western dock edge, provide the first part of the new High Street, and create a new pedestrian and cycle route from Canada Water Dock heading west to Lower Road, linking into Southwark Park.

What types of play spaces will be included within the Masterplan?

Play for all ages is incorporated in the designs for many places and spaces across the Masterplan, including playgrounds and nature trails. Further information can be found in the Design and Access Statement that was submitted with the application and can be found on the downloads section of the Planning Applications page.

Will there be covered public spaces?

An indoor hub will be located at the new park where people can meet undercover and it is expected that there will be cover in some of the streets and spaces within the new town centre.

Will there be places to sit and public toilets?

It’s important that the Masterplan creates somewhere locals and visitors feel comfortable and can spend time without having to buy anything. A new indoor hub -which will be located in the park- will have public toilets. The park will also have outdoor communal tables. Integrated seating, both formal and informal, will also be available in different locations including park walk (the route linking Russia Dock Woodland, Southwark Park and Surrey Quays Station) and the new town square.

How will the Masterplan connect with the existing area?

The Masterplan includes a number of physical links that will help connect it to the local area. This includes:

  • A new pedestrian link from the High Street to Lower Road;
  • A pedestrian / cycle route between Canada Water Dock and Greenland Dock;
  • A pedestrian / cycle route between Russia Dock Woodland and Southwark Park to provide a ‘two sided’ street at the junction by Surrey Quays Station and Redriff Road

 

New and existing bus routes will also be enhanced and routes to local schools will be made safer.

How will the streets and spaces be managed? Will they remain fully accessible to the public?

British Land Property Management, British Land’s in-house property management company, will manage the Masterplan area. The Masterplan creates a new town centre for all to enjoy and there will naturally be public access to, and through the park, gardens, streets and squares created.

 

The approach to public realm management will balance the safety of all those using the space with creating a welcoming environment for all. This will include customer service/security patrols to welcome and advise visitors, a dedicated cleaning team and an events programme that is sensitive to neighbours.

 

As part of the Master Development Agreement with Southwark Council we will also have the ability to manage Deal Porters Square and Red Bridge Square. If we exercise this option public access would not be changed and the pace would be managed in accordance with criteria agreed with the council.

3.8. BUILDING SCALE, DISTRIBUTION & DENSITY
Why are the proposals high density/include tall buildings?

This is a large 53-acre site, yet in its current state does little for the wider area and community here; it is mostly made up of parking spaces and has no housing.

 

In recognising the potential of the site the Greater London Authority has identified the site as an Opportunity Area and Housing Zone which requires the Canada Water area (which includes sites outside of the Canada Water Masterplan) to deliver at least 3,300 new homes. Southwark Council has also prepared an Area Action Plan to guide development by seeking increases in the number of homes that are to be delivered here to 4,500 by 2026, along with the creation of significant new employment opportunities.

 

We will be meeting the Council’s and GLA’s aspirations for the site and agree that this is an appropriate level of growth for the area.

 

There is significant potential here to bring about a range of real and tangible benefits for the existing and future community in and around Canada Water, as well as to London more generally. This includes not least the creation of new affordable homes, employment opportunities and public spaces for all to enjoy.

 

The Masterplan will create a new town centre for London, delivering a number of important benefits for the existing and future community. This includes 12 acres of new open spaces and places for everyone to enjoy including a new 3.5 acre park, the first new high street in London for 100 years and 16 new streets (covering 3.8km).

 

Ultimately, more development means that a greater amount of these benefits can be delivered, however, we are of course aware that the level of development needs to be appropriate here and that it needs to be balanced by the creation of new public services, infrastructure and public open spaces – which is why open spaces alone account for over a third of our masterplan.

 

It’s also important to remember that the Masterplan will not be built at once. It is a roughly 15-year project and so will be phased to account for the need to create new homes and jobs here at any given time.

How have building heights been distributed?

The Masterplan varies in scale, combining predominantly six storey buildings with some taller buildings. This includes eight buildings which are 18 storeys or higher.

 

This helps to achieve the GLA and council’s policy requirements for the area as an Opportunity Area and Housing Zone, as well as create a place that delivers real and tangible benefits for the community now and in the future.

 

The taller buildings proposed are clustered in locations that have been decided upon after extensive testing and consultation with Southwark Council design officers, the GLA and Historic England and step down to meet the surrounding context.

What assessments of daylight / sunlight and wind have been undertaken?

Detailed technical reports on the impact of the Masterplan in terms of daylight, sunlight and wind have been submitted as part of the planning application. They can be viewed on Southwark Council’s Planning Register and the Non-Technical Summary from the Environmental Statement is here.

 

We will continue to meet with neighbours of the site and residents with queries regarding the impact on their homes. If you would like to meet please get in touch.

3.9. HEALTH, EDUCATION & CHILDCARE
How will you ensure there are enough school places?

We see the Canada Water Masterplan becoming a ‘hub’ for local services and we have been working with the police, the NHS and Southwark education providers to understand how we can help deliver the infrastructure required to support the existing and growing local community.

 

In terms of education, we will provide a minimum £5m contribution to support the expansion of an existing, established local primary school, which would provide 210 additional places, plus additional top-up funding as required for local schools as the population grows.

 

We have also committed to providing space for a c.4,000 sq m 16+ education facility, if called upon by an education provider.

 

This provision is in line with the demand projections for school places, as outlined in the socio-economic assessment that was carried out as part of the planning application. This can be viewed in the downloads section of the Planning Application page.

What’s happening with King’s College London? Will there be a university campus in the Masterplan?

There remains an aspiration for higher education within the Masterplan and the application allows for this use to be incorporated.

 

In the meantime, we’re pleased to have welcomed TEDI London to the Printworks. TEDI London is a new higher education institution wholly focused on engineering and is a partnership of Arizona State University, King’s College, London and UNSW Sydney. British Land is a founding partner, and will support TEDI London’s ambitions for an industry-led curriculum by delivering projects, mentors and collaboration opportunities around the Masterplan for future students. Find out more about TEDI London’s programmes here

Are there plans for a new health centre in the Masterplan?

We see the Canada Water Masterplan becoming a ‘hub’ for local services and we have been working with the police, the NHS and education providers to understand how we can help deliver the infrastructure required to support the existing and growing local community.

 

In terms of health care, we have committed to providing land and/or funding for the delivery of a health facility, if called upon by the Clinical Commissioning Group/NHS.

Will there be additional nursery spaces?

The Masterplan includes floorspace which could accommodate nursery/childcare provisions and we’ll engage with potential occupiers and providers as the development progresses.

 

In addition, we have committed to providing community use space with the development, which could be in one or more units and leased to charities, social enterprises or community groups for the benefit of local residents; which could as an option accommodate a charitable nursery.

3.10. TRANSPORT & MOVEMENT
How will transport modes be improved to handle new residents/businesses once they move in?

We have spent the past three years working with Transport for London (TfL) and Southwark Council on a transport package to address the effects of the Masterplan. We know local people experience busy transport services during peak periods. The Masterplan will not be delivered overnight and over the next 15 years, working with TfL and Southwark Council, we will deliver transport improvements to address the Masterplan’s demand on local services.

 

We will deliver, in excess of £33m over the next 15 years towards a range of transport projects to increase capacity and frequency, make journeys quicker, and provide a greater range of choices to those living or working in Canada Water and the wider Rotherhithe and Surrey Docks area. This will mitigate the impacts of our future development. For a full summary of what we will deliver to help support local transport, see the Our Local Commitments document, here.

 

In addition to what we will deliver, TfL and Southwark Council have stated other projects, such as the Elizabeth Line (Crossrail), improvements to DLR services, Cycleway 4 and extending Santander Cycle Hire to Rotherhithe, along with changes in travel behaviour, will help relieve local congestion. TfL estimates 10-15% of passengers who use the Jubilee Line will change to the Elizabeth Line, increasing space for others. In addition, workers alighting at Canada Water will create space for local people to board. Longer term projects, like the Bakerloo Line extension to Lewisham, would also provide alternatives and change travel patterns further.

 

We have also actively supported a successful £80.8m bid for Government money as part of the Housing Infrastructure Fund (HIF) to increase the frequency of the Overground to 20 trains per hour (currently 16), improve Surrey Quays Station and deliver improvements to Canada Water bus station by 2024.

How will the Masterplan encourage cycling & walking?

We are making major improvements to encourage cycle as a sustainable alternative to cars and will deliver:

 

c.10,000 new cycle parking spaces, with 1,066 delivered in phase one, including the potential for provision for cargo bikes and those used by

disabled people and for children.

  • One year’s free cycle hire Santander membership for new residents.
  • Funds for six Santander cycle hire docking stations to link into the recently announced extension of the scheme to Canada Water and Rotherhithe.
  • Around 3.8 km of new streets and spaces for pedestrians and cyclists.
  • New and improved routes between the existing areas and the development – e.g. from the new High Street to Lower Road.
  • New pedestrian crossings and junction improvements.
  • Legible London wayfinding signage.
  • A Bicycle User Group which will coordinate cycle training, best practice and initiatives to encourage the uptake and support for cycling locally.
What are British Land's priorities for addressing air quality? How might more sustainable modes of transport be delivered?

We are committed to a strategy at Canada Water that minimises carbon dioxide emissions both now and in the future. We recognise our responsibility to manage environmental impacts and also to limit energy costs for residents, enhancing wellbeing and helping to manage local air quality.

 

In addition, our vision is to enable people to use sustainable transport and reduce car use, promoting the Healthy Streets philosophy in the Mayor of London’s Transport Strategy, the draft London Plan, Southwark Council’s emerging Movement Plan and the draft New Southwark Plan.

 

Our proposed measures seek to ensure 80% of trips will be by public transport, walking and cycling by 2033 and we aspire to achieve the Mayor’s targets for inner London for 90% to be by these modes by 2041.

 

To find out more about our strategies for transport and sustainability, please view sections 4B (pages 16 and 17) and 4E (pages 22 and 23) of Our Local Commitments document.

Why is there an aim to reduce car use and what practical steps could be taken towards this?

Our vision is to enable people to use sustainable transport and reduce car use, promoting the Healthy Streets philosophy in the Mayor of London’s Transport Strategy, the draft London Plan, Southwark Council’s emerging Movement Plan and the draft New Southwark Plan.

 

Our proposed measures seek to ensure 80% of trips will be by public transport, walking and cycling by 2033 and we aspire to achieve the Mayor’s targets for inner London for 90% to be by these modes by 2041.

 

To find out more about our strategies for transport, please view section 4B (pages 16 and 17) of Our Local Commitments document.

Is anything currently being done to address existing traffic issues on Jamaica Road, Lower Road and at the Rotherhithe Tunnel?

Transport for London (TfL) is the highway authority for Jamaica Road and the Rotherhithe Tunnel and Southwark Council is the authority for Lower Road. Both have a statutory responsibility to manage the highway network efficiently and this is an ongoing task.

 

Our focus is on encouraging active lifestyles and health and wellbeing, by providing more facilities and routes for walking and cycling as well as – crucially – creating viable alternatives to the car.

 

It is also important to note that car ownership, especially amongst younger people, has changed massively in the last 20 years. Keeping and running a car in London is expensive so many people don’t own a car and car share or hire when they need to. With this in mind, we have taken practical steps to limit the amount of car use as a result of the Masterplan – for example, only delivering on average, one car parking space for blue badge holders for every 10 homes – with a view to ensure that car travel is not increased by those working, living or visiting the Masterplan area once it is complete.

How does the timeline of development align with transport improvements? Will improvements happen alongside the Masterplan?

We are working closely with Southwark Council, the GLA and Transport for London on a range of measures to improve transport conditions locally and these will be introduced as the development phases proceed.

What will be the impact of the first plots for development on the transport network?

Detailed transport statements have been submitted as part of the planning application that confirm that that the number of trips arising from the first plots for development can be supported by the existing transport network and will not have a significant impact on conditions.

How will Cycleway 4 (formerly Cycle Superhighway 4) work successfully on Jamaica Road and Lower Road? Will there still be a bus lane?

Transport for London (TfL) is the highway authority for Jamaica Road and Southwark Council is the authority for Lower Road. Both have a statutory responsibility to manage the highway network efficiently and this is an ongoing task.

 

Further information on Cycleway 4 can be found here.

How will you avoid cycle/pedestrian conflict in the new town centre?

The design of the public realm is an important part of managing the different types of movements and activities that will take place in the new town centre and across the Masterplan.

 

Our aspirations for the town centre are to create streets and spaces where all ages and abilities of pedestrians and cyclists can share space as far as possible, without introducing excessive conflict. We’re taken time to explore ways in which movements can be managed and guided through the design of the spaces, materials used and routes proposed.

 

We want to avoid extensive separation and control of different users (pedestrians, cyclists, buses, cars) as far as possible while ensuring that the design remains safe for all to use.

Will Canada Water Station be able to cope with more people using the station in the future?

Extensive modelling has been undertaken by Southwark Council and Transport for London to produce a strategic transport strategy (STS) that will support the delivery of the Canada Water Opportunity Area.

 

TfL and Southwark Council have stated other projects, such as the Elizabeth Line (Crossrail), improvements to DLR services, Cycleway 4 and extending Santander Cycle Hire to Rotherhithe, along with changes in travel behaviour, will help relieve local congestion.

 

TfL estimates 10-15% of passengers who use the Jubilee Line will change to the Elizabeth Line, increasing space for others. In addition, workers alighting at Canada Water will create space for local people to board. Longer term projects, like the Bakerloo Line extension to Lewisham, would also provide alternatives and change travel patterns further.

 

That said, we will still be providing in excess of £33m over the next 15 years towards a range of transport projects to increase capacity and frequency, make journeys quicker, and provide a greater range of choices to those living or working in Canada Water and the wider Rotherhithe and Surrey Docks area. This will mitigate the impacts of our future development.

 

To find out more about our strategies for transport, please view section 4B (pages 16 and 17) of Our Local Commitments document.

 

What improvements are you making to Canada Water station?

We will still be providing in excess of £33m over the next 15 years towards a range of transport projects to increase capacity and frequency, make journeys quicker, and provide a greater range of choices to those living or working in Canada Water and the wider Rotherhithe and Surrey Docks area. This will mitigate the impacts of our future development.

 

This includes a financial contribution for TfL to provide additional staff, better communications and internal alterations to create more space for passengers and better enable use of the train services.

 

TfL and Southwark Council have stated other projects, such as the Elizabeth Line (Crossrail), improvements to DLR services, Cycleway 4 and extending Santander Cycle Hire to Rotherhithe, along with changes in travel behaviour, will help relieve local congestion.

 

TfL estimates 10-15% of passengers who use the Jubilee Line will change to the Elizabeth Line, increasing space for others. In addition, workers alighting at Canada Water will create space for local people to board. Longer term projects, like the Bakerloo Line extension to Lewisham, would also provide alternatives and change travel patterns further.

 

To find out more about our strategies for transport, please view section 4B (pages 16 and 17) of Our Local Commitments document.

Will there be a second entrance and/or station improvements at Surrey Quays Station?

Yes, we will be contributing to the funding of a second entrance/exit ticket hall providing step free access and reducing congestion, delivered by TfL.

What's the status of the river crossing to Canary Wharf? Will it happen and, if so, when?

In June 2019 the Greater London Authority announced that it has put plans for a Rotherhithe bridge crossing on hold while it reassesses other options for the bridge, including a ferry service.

 

Whilst this is disappointing news, we have developed our transport proposals for Canada Water without making any assumptions regarding this crossing.

How will improvements to bus services be considered as part of the Masterplan?

We have committed to:

  • Funding for two new high frequency bus routes, one between London Bridge, Canada Water and Greenwich and the other between Canada Water, Old Kent Road and Central London, as well as potential improvements to local bus links.
  • New bus stands along the new High Street with real time travel information.
  • Improved and new bus stands on existing highway in and around the development.
  • New driver facilities.
Will the cycle hire scheme be coming to the SE16 area?

Yes – and we will be offering one year’s free cycle hire Santander membership for new residents.

How will the river bus service contribute?

We’ve had a number of meetings with TfL River Services and river bus operator Thames Clippers about the role that the river might play in providing transport access and additional capacity for journeys made from the Masterplan area. Our discussions have been exploratory in nature to better understand planned improvements.

What was the Housing Infrastructure Fund (HIF) and how will this contribute to the transport improvements being made?

We actively supported a successful £80.8m bid for Government money as part of the Housing Infrastructure Fund (HIF) to increase the frequency of the Overground to 20 trains per hour (currently 16), improve Surrey Quays Station and deliver improvements to Canada Water bus station by 2024.

3.11. CAR PARKING
How many parking spaces are on the Masterplan area at the moment and how many are proposed in the future?

We are committed to creating viable alternatives to car use and as such are proposing the following:

  • Far fewer town centre car parking spaces, reducing from c. 1,900 today to 1,000 spaces when the Masterplan is completed.
  • Disabled car parking provision only for the new homes, with a maximum of one car parking space for every ten homes.
  • No private car parking for the offices and other commercial uses, other than a few spaces for disabled people.
  • Funding made available for highway improvements and amendments to/extension of the Controlled Parking Zones in the area, if required by the local community.
There are mixed views between residents who would like to maximise parking to prevent ‘overspill’ into neighbouring streets; and those who would like to see parking / car-use reduced and public transport alternatives provided - how will both these viewpoints be addressed?

We have heard a range different views on parking levels throughout the consultation – it has been one of the most polarising elements and we’re aware of local concerns around car ownership and parking by residents living in car-free developments.

 

The level of town centre and resident parking provided by the masterplan needs to be balanced and ensure that sustainable forms of transport are encouraged, while ensuring we can attract a wide range of retail and leisure occupiers and users to the site and maintain the viability and vitality of the town centre, and that those who require a car such as those with a disability, can park. The level of car parking we’re arrived at within the planning application (see previous question) is a result of a long period of testing, analysis and discussion with stakeholders including potential occupiers, Southwark Council and TfL, and we think strikes the right balance.

 

We will continue to work with Southwark Council to discourage new residents and users of the town centre from parking on neighbouring streets.  We are aware of the Council’s proposals to introduce a peninsula wide CPZ to deal with existing on street parking pressures.  We have already offered to provide funding to monitor parking on local streets, and funding to deliver amendments to local CPZs in the future, should local residents call for them.  This is secured in our s106 agreement.  The s106 also includes a clause preventing residents moving into homes in the Masterplan from applying for parking permits in local CPZs. We’re also proposing mechanisms to encourage a move away from car use and a change in local travel behaviour. This will include the collection of car parking charges to contribute to a sustainable transport fund which will support this, and the potential for the removal of car parking spaces if they’re underused over time.

What car parking will be provided within the first detailed plots (A1, A2, K1)?

There will be some car parking provided with these plots, most of which will be for blue badge holders. For a summary please see Section 3 ‘First Detailed Plots’.

3.12. LANDSCAPE, ECOLOGY AND BIODIVERSITY
What work has been done to understand the existing landscape, ecology and biodiversity?

Specialist consultants including Waterman Ecology have undertaken a range of ecology surveys to understand what wildlife the site currently supports and to identify new opportunities for local wildlife, including supporting protected species.

Will the Masterplan harm existing wildlife? What is the strategy for protecting existing, and encouraging new, wildlife?

The Masterplan aims to retain and enhance valuable wildlife habitats, such as the dock reedbeds and open water, whilst creating new habitats and opportunities for wildlife. Ultimately the Masterplan will provide more and better quality wildlife habitat than the existing site and more opportunity for people to engage in nature. We’ve also been working with the London Wildlife Trust on the plans for the dock to ensure these enhance the local habitat and support the wildlife.

 

The precise detail of the dock works will be subject to a future reserved matters application following engagement with local stakeholders and will be delivered alongside Zone D.

 

We’ve also committed to retaining and enhancing the Prince of Orange walkway area and to work with local residents on the plans for this.

Will there be green spaces? How will the proposals protect and enhance the ‘green and blue’ character of the local area?

Ecology and the ‘green / blue’ environment have been key influences for the Masterplan, having been highlighted by the local community as important and valued local characteristics in the very first phases of community engagement back in 2014. Overall at least 35% of the Masterplan will be public open space, including the new park and dock office courtyard as predominantly green spaces. The public spaces and routes throughout the masterplan will include trees and planting, and the greening of buildings will take place to enhance local wildlife habitats and provide feeding opportunities.

 

Canada Water Dock is an important area where the wildlife habitat is being improved and brought back to its former high quality, whilst also enabling more human access to nature. We’ve been working with the London Wildlife Trust in developing the proposals for Canada Water Dock, to ensure that these enhance the area which is designated a Site of Importance for Nature Conservation and overall habitat. This includes increasing the amount of reedbed and raising the water level to improve habitat for breeding wetland birds such as reed warbler, coot, moorhen and tufted duck, as well as the creation of a sensitive dock crossing.

3.13. TREES
What is happening to the trees on site?

The Masterplan will provide extensive planting of trees across a variety species, providing different seasonal colours and interest on and around the site. However, some short-term changes will need to be made to enable the Masterplan to be delivered.

 

Guaranteed through a s.106 legal agreement with Southwark Council we will plant around 1,200 trees on and around the Canada Water Masterplan site by 2038. This includes over 500 medium-to-large sized trees that will be planted off-site around the local area, and we would welcome any suggestions about where these might be planted by emailing team@canadawater.mc-staging.net. A review will be undertaken every four years to track the tree canopy cover against the 2038 target set out in the Masterplan Planning Permission.

 

Of the existing trees on site, a number are protected in a ‘Tree Retention Plan’ (contained within Annex 25). While we have sought to maintain other existing trees wherever possible, some will need to be removed due to their condition, or to allow development. Any existing trees removed are not considered ‘high quality’, as reported in the Arboricultural Impact Assessment submitted as part of the Masterplan planning application.

 

We will, however, only remove trees where this is necessary and will communicate this fully with neighbours on an ongoing basis. The loss of any trees will be temporary, as additional planting will be undertaken in 2020, and by 2023 the full landscaping works for Phase 1 of the Canada Water Masterplan are expected to be completed.

 

We are working with a range of expert consultants to ensure that in the long term the Masterplan creates new landscaped spaces, habitats and enhances local biodiversity. Overall, the completed Masterplan will see a significant net gain in the site’s biodiversity and ecological offer.

Will you plant new trees outside of the Masterplan area?

c. 572 new trees will also be planted off-site and we are talking to local groups about where these could be planted and will take advice from the Tree Council.

Would new trees be mature or young trees?

We’ll aim to create an impact from day one by providing a number of trees of semi-mature quality.

3.14. ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY
What sustainability targets will the Masterplan meet?

We are committed to a strategy at Canada Water that minimizes carbon dioxide emissions both now and in the future. We recognise our responsibility to manage environmental impacts and also to limit energy costs for residents, enhancing wellbeing and helping to manage local air quality.

 

Southwark Council has reinforced its commitment to environmental issues by joining the International Climate Change Campaign and declaring a Climate Change Emergency. We absolutely share these concerns. Our objectives are aligned with the Mayor of London’s plans to build a sustainable London for the future and TfL’s ‘Healthy Streets’ approach has been embedded in the design. By introducing a wealth of new plant life, green open spaces and green buildings, we will increase biodiversity in the area, as well as respecting and enhancing the unique ecology of Canada Water Dock and the heritage of the area.

 

This development adheres to British Land’s Wellbeing Principles to ensure that we are doing our bit to improve people’s health, happiness and productivity.

 

As a company, we are measuring ourselves against the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals and are constantly piloting new technologies in our developments.

 

We will also work with local interest groups and schools to maximise the biodiversity and ecological benefit from the Masterplan.

 

To find out more about our commitments to ensuring that Canada Water is sustainable now and in the future, please visit section 4E (pages 22 and 23) of the Our Local Commitments document.

What is the approach to water management and Sustainable Urban Drainage (SUDS)?

The Masterplan aims to incorporate meaningful use of water, reflecting the heritage of the area. Ideas include looking at the functional and sustainable use of water to underpin the character of water use on site, including the ‘dock-link’, swales, water fountains, water-play and enhanced use of Canada Water Dock.

 

The use of Sustainable Urban Drainage (SuDs) is a key aspect of the proposals and provides a natural approach to managing drainage. SuDs work by slowing and holding back rain water that runs off a site, allowing natural processes to break down pollutants. Distributing surface water run off where possible through soft SuDs has benefits such as creating new wildlife habitat.

 

The use of softer SuDs will minimise the need for attenuation tanks and reduce run-off into the local sewer network. SuDs will maximise surface water discharge to Canada Water in lieu of draining all flows to the sewer network (as per existing situation). This will be beneficial at Canada Water Dock through temporarily increasing the water levels when rainfall occurs. The water quality would be carefully managed to ensure wildlife is protected.

 

The SuDS strategy has been incorporated within the landscape proposals, including rain gardens, swales, and tree pit storage. Living roofs are also being considered, and will be maximised where possible. Below ground modular attenuation tanks or oversized pipes would also be required to attenuate flows sufficiently. The strategy allows for rainfall up to the 1 in 100 year storm event, including 40% increase in the rainfall intensity due to future climate change.

What impact will the new development have on local noise and air quality?

On air quality, we will minimise emissions through a number of design initiatives, including:

  • Using on-site energy sources which mitigate the impact of the development and benefit local air quality.
  • Minimising car parking spaces to encourage low-emissions and sustainable transport methods such as cycling, walking and public transport.
  • Prioritising pedestrian movement over vehicular movement through the landscape design of the public realm
  • Creating public awareness campaigns will reduce vehicle idling and promote the use of shared mobility in Southwark, improving air quality within the Masterplan.
  • Implementing mitigation measures during construction to minimise air quality impacts.

 

In terms of noise, space planning and strategic internal layouts of detailed plots have been designed to reduce noise exposure to ensure that residential and other spaces are suitable for their intended use. Areas of the site that are distant and / or screened from the local road network have a much lower noise level, quiet areas have been promoted and protected where possible to contribute to a positive soundscape.

 

In addition, during construction and demolition we will adhere to the Council’s Code of Construction Practice and work closely with Southwark Council and the neighbouring community to minimise disturbance during construction.

 

  • Other measures to reduce noise impact include but are not limited to: ensuring any significant noise generating works are planned well in advance and sensitive areas notified;
  • use of low noise techniques;
  • ensuring all plant on site complies with relevant noise limits and that all plant is properly maintained and operated;
  • where feasible, all stationary plant be located so as to keep noise at all occupied sensitive areas to a minimum;
  • plant on the site operating intermittently to be shut down when not in use;
  • noise monitoring and establishment of noise Action Levels in consultation with Southwark Council;
  • use of hoardings to the required height and density; and, implementation of a Construction and Logistics Plan (CLP) to pre-plan and manage traffic associated with the works.
How will you ensure the streets and spaces in and around the Masterplan are pleasant places to be – in terms of daylight / shadow, wind & noise?

Microclimate testing has informed building modelling to reduce impact and support enjoyable public spaces. The Design Guidelines also require consideration to be given to these issues at future Reserved Matters Applications. For more information, please see the Non-Technical Summary of the Environmental Statement, which is available to view here.

3.15. CANADA WATER DOCK
What research and investigations have been done to fully understand the dock today?

The team has carried out a range of investigations and research into Canada Water Dock to ensure we understand the existing conditions and habitat. This has included: dock wall inspections, measuring the dock levels, water and sediment quality, fish population, habitat survey, breeding bird survey and bat survey.

What are the plans for Canada Water Dock?

We will enhance the dock, integrate it into the Masterplan area and restore the ecological quality of the dock and its status as a Site of Importance for Nature Conservation.

 

This will be done by making significant ecological improvements such as the restoration of the water levels and wetland habitat. This work will be done in partnership with our strategic partner, the London Wildlife Trust.

 

In addition, we will also be making improvements to the dock edges, including ecological enhancements to the western edge, a planted and active edge to the south and a new boardwalk crossing over the wetlands. The precise detail of the dock works will be subject to a future reserved matters application following engagement with local stakeholders and will be delivered alongside Zone D.

 

A joined-up approach will be taken to the dock edges including ecological enhancements to the western edge, a planted and active edge to the south and a new boardwalk crossing over the wetlands.

Why are there plans for a boardwalk over the dock?

The boardwalk will provide better access to high quality natural space and better connect people and nature as well as providing good access to and from the town centre. We’re continuing to work with London Wildlife Trust to ensure the proposals enhance the habitat for wildlife; they bring with them significant experience from Woodberry Wetlands which we’ll continue to learn from.

How would the proposals be built-out with minimal impact to wildlife?

London Wildlife Trust will advise on the timing of improving the wetlands, introducing the boardwalk and activating the dock’s edges in line with the phasing of the development and the season, so that there is minimal impact to wildlife.

Who will manage Canada Water Dock?

We would like to take over management of the dock from Southwark Council to ensure proper maintenance of the crossing and wetlands as well as appropriate water management. London Wildlife Trust has been brought on board to advise and learn from similar projects such as how to manage litter.

Will there be opportunities for local involvement?

We want to involve the local community in making the dock a welcoming place for all. London Wildlife Trust has good experience in doing this in London. This could include educational activity, the opportunity to volunteer and wildlife updates.

What are the plans for water management?

Our objective is to increase and then maintain the dock’s water level and quality to enhance the wildlife and natural habitat. This will be achieved by collecting direct rainwater, maintaining levels through surface water drainage, extracting water from the local acquifer and providing a new pump to sustain water levels.

What will happen to the anglers?

We’re in ongoing conversation with Rotherhithe Anglers. Due to water depth we don’t anticipate moving them and fishing will remain free.

3.16. NEW LEISURE CENTRE
Why is a leisure centre proposed as part of the Masterplan?

Southwark Council has long been seeking to replace the ageing Seven Islands and it’s our ambition to support Southwark Council in providing a new facility at Canada Water. As well as being part of our Master Development Agreement with Southwark Council, a new leisure centre will also make it easier for people in the community to be more physically active, a key ambition of the Masterplan.

 

After being asked by Southwark Council to carry out a study of alternative Leisure Centre locations in May 2017, British Land consulted on three locations within the Masterplan area, and Plot A2 (one of the first detailed plots) was preferred locally.

 

The new leisure centre will be a larger and more modern replacement to the current Seven Islands leisure centre and will include:

  • An 8 lane, 25m swimming pool (425m2);
  • A 7m x 20m learner pool (145m2) with movable floor;
  • Separate male, female and family wet change facilities;
  • 4 court sports hall (690m2);
  • A 150+ station gym;
  • 2 dance studios (148m2 and 128m2);
  • A spin studio; and,
  • Dedicated Soft Play Area
Who would run the Leisure Centre and how have the facilities been decided?

It is proposed that Southwark Council will take on the new Canada Water leisure centre. The Council currently retains an external partner (Everyone Active) to manage its leisure centres. The Council has established the brief for facilities based on guidance from Sport England and a variety of other bodies.

Where will the new leisure centre be built? Have other locations been considered? Can the existing Seven Islands Leisure Centre be rebuilt instead?

A range of sites were considered and consulted on by Southwark Council and British Land. Following a study of potential locations within the Masterplan area and consultation on the preferred locations, Plot A2 was established as the preferred location in a mixed-use building (this was the preferred location in public feedback received).

 

This site is in an accessible location, allows the delivery of the leisure centre as part of the first detailed plots for development and ensures that there will be continuous leisure provision in the local area.

 

Southwark Council’s preference is to provide a new leisure centre within the Masterplan area rather than build a new leisure centre where Seven Islands is currently located. This will enable residents to continue to have access to leisure facilities as the current centre can continue to operate until the new facility is completed.

When will the new leisure centre be built and operational?

Due to ongoing Covid-19 restrictions we are reviewing when works could safely and reasonably begin, and we will share more information on programmes before works begin.

3.17. INCLUSIVITY, CULTURE & HERITAGE
How will you make the spaces and places feel welcoming for everyone?

The mix of uses and public spaces will create a vibrant place where people want to spend time, including a wide-ranging retail and leisure offer for different budgets and different spaces for different life stages where people feel comfortable enough to relax and enjoy the new surroundings.

 

At British Land we believe that places should feel different and reflective of the local area and context, so that they are part of the local community and connect with those who live, work and shop in and around our local centres; and this approach will be applied to the Canada Water Masterplan. It will be achieved through a range of ways including building design, landscaping, enlivenment and events programming, the retail and leisure strategy, and public art. The Social Regeneration Charter also includes this as a priority, and we also hope that by supporting local residents to benefit from employment and business opportunities, this will further strengthen local links.

Will it be somewhere that everyone can afford to be?

We want the Masterplan to be somewhere which the whole community uses, values and enjoys spending time. There will be a range of high street and independent outlets to suit different budgets as well as places to sit throughout. There will be plenty of public seating, new public spaces such as the town square and park, and free events and activities for all to use and enjoy without having to spend any money. Use of public toilets will be for free and there will be designated spots for people to eat their own food.

 

To ensure the right balance of retailers, we will be supporting local businesses to access space by allocating around 5,000 sq m of retail space available at no more than 80% of market rent for 10 years with a priority for local Southwark business. We will also be providing c.200,000 sq m of office and workspace (similar to the size of More London), home to around 20,000 jobs (including retail and leisure), of which around 7,000 sq m will be made available at discounted rent levels for 15 years, meaning around 500 people will be working in companies benefitting from reduced rents

 

In terms of housing, we have committed to 35% of homes across the Masterplan will be affordable, split 70% social rented housing and 30% intermediate affordable housing. Six out of every 10 of these affordable homes will be two or more bedrooms, so suitable for families.

Will it be accessible for people with limited mobility?

The Masterplan will be DDA compliant (Disability Discrimination Act) and shop mobility will be provided in the new town centre.

What part has the area’s history and heritage played in the development of the plans? How is it reflected in the proposals?

Since 2014, British Land has been working with the local community in and around Canada Water, Rotherhithe and Surrey Docks to get to know the area and ensure that we understand local priorities, concerns and aspirations. We have met a wide range of people and learned a lot about the rich history and heritage of the area.

 

Culture and heritage have been embedded in the Masterplan from the start. The area’s ‘green and blue’ history informs both building design and public spaces taking inspiration from the immediate and surrounding area. The area’s history is reflected in building materiality and a huge amount of research has taken place including taking care to speak to as many people from different elements of the local community as possible.

 

We have already started to undertake a range of initiatives to help promote culture in the area, such as sponsoring the World by the Water: an Exhibition of Canada Water & Rotherhithe History.

What is the cultural strategy? How have local people been involved and will there be opportunities for local people to be involved in the future?

The Cultural Strategy for the Masterplan sets out a long-term framework and priorities for how the Masterplan can best reflect and create a sense of ownership with the existing and future community. It was led by Graham Devlin, ex Deputy Chief Executive of Arts Council England, and focuses upon how culture will make a vital contribution to the Masterplan and surrounding area by enhancing the wellbeing of individuals, health of the community and development of a happy and inclusive society. It also reflects the broad view of culture, held by British Land as one capable of embracing a very wide range of activity – from rollerblading to drama, from growing, cooking and eating together to outdoor art or craft projects, from heritage explorations to world class gigs and concerts.

 

To inform the strategy we held a range of sessions with both young people and adults to hear their views on what makes a place inclusive. We also held a consultation topic session on the cultural strategy in December 2017 as well as meetings with local groups, to help inform the strategy’s priorities. More information can be found in the Cultural Strategy which forms part of the planning application.

Are the names for the streets and spaces decided? Can local people be involved in the naming process?

We recognise that naming is important locally; all names within the Masterplan planning application documents are working names. There will be community engagement on the naming of key spaces as the plans progress.

3.18. MANAGEMENT, SAFETY & THE MASTER DEVELOPMENT AGREEMENT
What is the Master Development Agreement (MDA)?

The Master Development Agreement (MDA) is the umbrella agreement between Southwark Council and British Land. Its purpose is to set out the obligations and responsibilities between us and Southwark Council in enabling the delivery of the Masterplan.

Will there be opportunity for local involvement in public events & activities?

Yes. We want to ensure that there are a range of events of activities which build on and support existing activities and bring new and exciting things to the area.

 

We have already been doing this with our work in the Shopping Centre, including providing a community space run by local charity Time and Talents (T&T2 opposite Tesco), and the ‘Little Explorers’ programme of activities run by local organisations over summer 2019.

 

We are still some time away from having new spaces and streets to manage, so we will continue to engage with and seek ideas and input from the local community on this as the project progresses. This is captured in the Culture Strategy and Social Regeneration Charter.

Will there be a police hub in the Masterplan?

We see the Canada Water Masterplan becoming a ‘hub’ for local services and we have been working with the police, the NHS and education providers to understand how we can help deliver the infrastructure required to support the existing and growing local community.

 

This includes space, if called upon by the Metropolitan Police, for a new police hub for local neighbourhood teams.

 

The Masterplan team regularly attends police ward panels to try to keep abreast of community safety concerns in the area.

Will there be security? How will it be managed so that it isn’t over bearing?

Public realm management will balance the safety of all those using the space with creating a welcoming environment for all. This will include customer service/security patrols to welcome and advise visitors. The area will also be covered by CCTV operated from a central security control room which could also be used by the police as a hub.

3.19. PHYSICAL INFRASTRUCTURE (WATER, ELECTRICITY, GAS, TELECOMMUNICATIONS, SEWERS, BROADBAND)
Will the development improve broadband coverage to the wider area?

The Masterplan will include high-speed broadband and provision of town centre Wi-Fi. We will continue to support Southwark Council’s efforts to encourage existing broadband providers to improve local services and download speeds.

4.1. OVERALL QUESTIONS
Together, what will the first detailed Plots (A1, A2, K1) provide?

The first detailed plots accommodate a wide range of uses including:

  • 265 new homes;
  • 38,222 square metres of workspace;
  • A new leisure centre;
  • 1,600 square metres of new shops and places to eat

Alongside this, we will also deliver significant public realm enhancements, including:

  • An enhanced Dock Office courtyard and community square;
  • A new pedestrian link to Lower Road from the High Street;
  • A re-landscaped High Street along the western dock edge;
  • A replanted and redesigned western dock edge; and
  • A relocated petrol filling station, with a new pedestrian link from Surrey Quays Shopping Centre to Lower Road.

 

35% of the new homes in the first detailed plots will be affordable, split 70% social rent and 30% intermediate affordable.

 

There will be 265 homes in two buildings in the first phase, of which 87 homes will be affordable including 60 council homes at social rents and 27 intermediate – home to around 500 people overall.

What is the construction timescale? When will they be in use?

Due to ongoing Covid-19 restrictions we are reviewing when this work could safely and reasonably begin, and we will share more information on programmes before works begin.

 

The target date for the completion of the Masterplan is 2034.

 

Further information on the construction management of the Masterplan can be found in Section 5 of the Frequently Asked Questions

How have neighbours to these plots been consulted? How will they continue to be involved?

A range of meetings (some group and some one-to-one) have taken place with neighbours to the first detailed plots, in addition to the more general drop-in consultation which has taken place. Please see the Statement of Community Involvement for more details.

 

We’ll continue to involve and keep neighbours (as well as the wider community) updated throughout construction and we will also explore establishing a construction liaison group.

 

You can get in contact with the team by visiting the Contact page.

Where can I view daylight and sunlight studies?

Detailed technical reports on the impact of the Masterplan in terms of daylight, sunlight and wind have been submitted as part of the planning application. They can be viewed on Southwark Council’s Planning Register and the Non-Technical Summary from the Environmental Statement is here. A summary of the assessments of the first detailed plots can be viewed here and of the Masterplan as a whole here.

 

We will continue to meet with neighbours of the site and residents with queries regarding the impact on their homes. If you would like to meet please get in touch.

Have you undertaken ground investigations? What will happen if contamination is present on site?

The potential for ground contamination is considered as detailed proposals for each plot are brought forward, with appropriate measures taken to ensure any impacts are mitigated. This Environmental Statement, which was submitted as part of the planning application, sets out in full how any potential contamination will be managed.

 

A summary note of ground investigations that have taken place to date with details on the potential for contaminated land to be present on the site of the Surrey Quays Shopping Centre car park and development zone A, and mitigations that will be in place to ensure any associated environmental effects are addressed is available here.

How will heavy goods vehicles access plots A1 and A2 during construction?

The planning application includes a new haul road which will be used during construction of the first phase, and it would subsequently be converted into a key pedestrian and cycle route linking the new High Street and Canada Water Dock with Lower Road once complete. A summary note on the proposals that were submitted as part of the planning application is available here.

4.2. PLOT A1
What are the proposals for Plot A1?

Plot A1 is a mixed-use building incorporating ground floor retail (shops and restaurants), 5-storeys of office and a 35-storey tall element providing 186 new homes.

 

Clustered together with existing tall buildings, Plot A1 marks the entrance to the new High Street and steps down towards neighbouring buildings to the south and west. The architecture, details, colours and materials have been developed taking inspiration from local heritage (please see the question on “How has the architectural identity been informed” below).

 

Plot A1 is a car-free development with no car parking provision. This will be enforced by residents, visitors and people working in the building being unable to apply for on-street parking permits.

 

As part of the first detail plots (A1, A2 and K1), significant improvements to the public streets are proposed, including landscaping of the Dock Office Courtyard, replanting and redesigning of the Western Dock Edge, providing the first section of the new High Street.

How many new homes will be delivered on the site? What size?

Plot A1 will provide 186 homes. This will include 10 Studios (5%), 82 1-bed (44%), 78 2-bed (42%) and 16 3-bed (9%) homes. All homes will meet or exceed Greater London Authority and Southwark Council minimum space standards, and 95% of homes are dual aspect.

 

The first residential detailed plots, Plot A1 and Plot K1, combined will deliver a minimum of 35% affordable housing with a policy compliant tenure mix of 70% social rented and 30% intermediate affordable (subject to grant availability). The majority of affordable housing will be located in Plot K1 with some intermediate affordable homes located in Plot A1.

Are the Dock Offices included in the plans?

Plot A1 includes the courtyard of the original Dock Offices, which will become a new community space. The former Dock Offices and Dock Managers’ Office are Grade II listed and will be retained.

 

The building frontage is set back along Surrey Quay Road to enable retention of the existing trees and so that the Dock Office clock tower remains a focal point.

How will the tall building impact neighbours?

We understand that the height and the massing of the proposed tall element has been of interest to our neighbours since it was first proposed some three years ago.

 

In response to feedback and specifically to mitigate against issues around impact and massing, the overall height of the building was reduced from 50 to 35 storeys (prior to planning submission) and its design has been revisited.

 

Further, in the revised plans submitted in October 2018, the amount of balustrading was also reduced to minimise any impact on protected viewing corridors.

 

Technical assessments covering daylight/sunlight and views and wind have helped inform the design of the building. These assessments form part of the planning application. Please see the Daylight and Sunlight Report, Chapters 15 and 16 of the Environmental Statement Vol 1 and Environmental Statement Vol 3 for further details.

How has the architectural design been informed?

Plot A1 is designed to read as a composition of different buildings, with smaller scale elements facing the west and the south to respond to the immediate context set by the dock office and residential neighbours. The tall element is located on the north-east corner and its mass is also broken down into three individual elements stepped at different heights. This enables the perception of a family of buildings, breaking down the mass and accentuating more elegant and slender proportions.

 

Each element has its own character taking inspiration from local historic materials, colours and details. The palette is simple with red, yellow and pale bricks for the three lower office buildings in reference to the Dock Office and local wharf buildings. The red, grey and pale coloured metal panel for the taller building is in reference to the local historic structures and engineered building components.

 

The design process has been informed by a series of pre-application meetings with Southwark Council as well as a number of public consultation events and home visits with immediate neighbours to enable the integration of feedback into the design development of the building. In addition, a design review session was held with the Design Council CABE and Southwark Design Review Panel. The scheme was also presented to Historic England.

Will there be any impact on internet, mobile or satellite reception from this tall building?

British Land are engaged with telecom service providers to implement expansion and improvement to the existing local network and the Canada Water development. Investment into the local network is not expected to negatively impact existing user experience.

 

Potential impacts to TV and radio reception has been assessed. Pre-construction and post-construction TV reception surveys will be undertaken to ensure any impacts caused by the new buildings are identified and appropriate mitigation is provided. A Masterplan Utilities & Services Infrastructure Strategy and a Masterplan Radio & TV Interference Assessment have been completed as part of the due diligence for the Development and is included in the Planning Application.

How has British Land consulted on Plot A1 to date?

British Land has been consulting on the Canada Water Masterplan since 2014. A summary of specific consultation on Plot A1 to date is below:

 

  • 2014-17: Consultation on the principles of Plot A1 over four main stages of consultation. This included reducing the building height from c50 storeys
  • Autumn 2017: Alongside development of the First Detailed Plots, one to one meetings/home visits were offered to c.260 households in close proximity to Plots A1 (and A2)
  • January 2018: The design team held a dedicated session with the site’s neighbours to specifically discuss detailed proposals for Plot A1
  • June 2018: The design team held a follow-up session the site’s neighbours to discuss the planning application for Plot A1
  • September 2019: Southwark Council’s planning committee unanimously resolved to grant planning permission for the Masterplan, including Plot A1.
  • Ongoing: British Land and the project team continue to hold one to one meetings with direct neighbours as requested.

 

Since 2014 our website has been updated to show the latest designs as well as all consultation materials and documents. All consultation materials can be found on our Downloads page.

4.3. PLOT A2
What are the proposals for Plot A2?

Plot A2 is a mixed-use scheme which provides a leisure centre at ground and basement levels, town centre retail and food outlets along the High Street, and workspace at upper levels.

 

It is six storeys in height at the High Street, stepping down to five storeys towards Lower Road.

 

As part of the first detail plots (A1, A2 and K1), significant improvements to the public streets are also proposed, including landscaping of the Dock Office Courtyard, replanting and redesigning of the Western Dock Edge, providing the first section of the new High Street.

Will the Leisure Centre be included?

Yes, we will be providing a larger, more modern replacement to the current Seven Islands leisure centre. This will include:

  • An 8 lane, 25m swimming pool (425m2);
  • A 7m x 20m learner pool (145m2) with movable floor;
  • Separate male, female and family wet change facilities;
  • 4 court sports hall (690m2);
  • A 150+ station gym;
  • 2 dance studios (148m2 and 128m2);
  • A spin studio; and,
  • Dedicated Soft Play Area

After being asked by Southwark Council to carry out a study of alternate Leisure Centre locations, British Land consulted on three locations within the Masterplan area in May 2017, and Plot A2 was preferred locally. Southwark Council are clear that they do not regard redevelopment of a new leisure centre on the existing Seven Islands site as an option.

 

Below is a comparison of existing facilities at Seven Islands and the recently developed The Castle Leisure Centre at Elephant and Castle; and the facilities proposed in Plot A2.

 

SEVEN ISLANDS EXISTING FACILITIES

THE CASTLE

PLOT A2

 

6 lane, 33m pool

(c.430m2 water area)

6 lane, 25m pool (320m2) 8 lane, 25m swimming pool (425m2)
Learner pool (disused) 13mx13m learner pool with movable floor (169m2) 7m x 20m learner pool (145m2) with movable floor. 
Separate male and female wet change facilities Separate male, female and family wet change facilities Separate male, female and family wet change facilities
Assembly hall (195m2) 4 court sports hall (594m2) 4 court sports hall (690m2)
60 station gym 127 station gym 150+ station gym
1 dance studio (118m2) 2 dance studios 2 dance studios (148m2 and 128m2)
Spin studio Spin studio
Crèche Dedicated Soft Play Area

 

What other uses will be included in the building?

The new leisure centre will be delivered at ground and basement levels, alongside retail along the high street and retail and workspace on the upper floors. For more information please scroll down to the downloads section of the Planning Application page and click on Detailed Application to download the revised Design and Access Statement for Plot A2.

How will the building impact neighbours’ sunlight/daylight, views and privacy?

Neighbours have been a core consideration from the outset of the design of A2. Extensive changes have been made to the design to reduce the impact on daylight/sunlight and privacy, including setbacks, height reductions, stepping and planting, including further amendments since the June 2019 resubmission. The building has also been shaped to minimise impact in relation to daylight/sunlight and overlooking, however, some impact is unavoidable when developing on an undeveloped site.

How will you treat the retained greenspace next to the Prince of Orange Walkway?

Planting will be chosen to ensure dense, year-round foliage cover at the appropriate levels. Both the type of planting and its maintenance regime will be subject to a planning condition which will require full maintenance details to be provided and the planting to be in place prior to the building being occupied. Following the resubmission of the application, the planted terraces on the levels above have also been set back a further 3m incrementally. We have also been working with partners such as Global Generation in order to consider the most appropriate future for the space.

How can you guarantee that the proposed planting will ensure privacy and be well maintained?

Planting will be chosen to ensure dense, year-round foliage cover at the appropriate levels. Both the type of planting and its maintenance regime will be subject to a planning condition which will require full maintenance details to be provided and the planting to be in place prior to the building being occupied. If you would like to arrange a meeting to discuss this further, then please do get in touch with the team via the Contact page.

How has the architectural design been informed?

The design concept for Plot A2 is that of a “modern warehouse”. Taking inspiration from the historic deal sheds of its dockside setting, the striking, functional and repetitive form of the deal sheds has strongly influenced the approach to facade composition, materials and detailing.

 

Feedback from consultation has been a key factor in the distinctive heritage reference and use of materials including timber.

Will a route through Hothfield Place to the new town centre be provided?

The approved plans for A2 do not include any changes to the existing access to the Masterplan site from Hothfield Place. British Land has committed to discuss and agree future access arrangements with local residents when Plot B1 begins to be designed (this will not be as part of the first phase of the development). We look forward to consulting with neighbours and the wider community regarding plans for maintaining, closing, or enhancing access from Hothfield Place at this stage.

Will there be a car parking?

Plot A2 will be car-free except for four wheelchair blue-badge parking spaces on the High Street.

How will you ensure there is no contamination to the site given its current use as a Petrol Filling Station?

Any potential impact of contamination at Plot A2 has been considered and appropriate mitigation will be taken to ensure that there is no contamination to the site. This Environmental Statement, which was submitted as part of the planning application, sets out in full how any potential contamination will be managed.

 

A summary note of the works that will be carried out to ensure that there is no contamination from past uses, or from the construction of the site, can be downloaded here.

How has British Land consulted on Plot A2 to date?

British Land has been consulting on the Canada Water Masterplan since 2014. A summary of specific consultation on Plot A2 to date is below:

 

  • January 2015 onwards: Ongoing engagement (meetings, letters, home visits) with adjacent site neighbours. Initial home visits took place in relation to the former ‘Plot 6’ site for the Leisure Centre.
  • May 2017: British Land committed to retain green space adjacent to Prince of Orange Walkway. After being asked by Southwark Council to carry out a study of alternate Leisure Centre locations, British Land consulted on three locations within the Masterplan area (A2 was preferred locally).
  • January 2018: The design team held a dedicated session with the site’s neighbours to specifically discuss the planning application for Plot A2. Ongoing meetings and discussions have also been held with neighbouring residents.
  • June 2018: The design team held a dedicated session with the site’s neighbours to discuss the planning application for Plot A2
  • September 2019: Southwark Council’s planning committee unanimously resolved to grant planning permission for the Masterplan, including Plot A2.
  • Ongoing: British Land and the project team continue to hold one to one meetings with direct neighbours as requested.

 

Since 2014 our website has been updated to show the latest designs as well as all consultation materials and documents. All consultation materials can be found on our Downloads page.

4.4. PLOT K1
What are the proposals for Plot K1?

Plot K1 is a 5 to 6 storey residential building, stepping down towards Russia Dock Woodland.  It will provide 79 affordable homes, split 76% social rent and 24% intermediate. The will include 14 1-bed homes (18%), 26 2-bed homes (33%) and 39 3-bed homes (49%). All homes within Plot K1 either meet or exceed the Greater London Authority and Southwark Council minimal space standards and are dual aspect as a minimum, with some being triple aspect.

 

Its location next to the Russia Dock Woodland and Alfred Salter primary school, makes it a fantastic location for families. To accommodate families, [65 of the homes being provided in K1 will be two bed or more (including 39 three-bedroom homes).

 

Plot K1 will be car-free except for 4 wheelchair blue-badge parking spaces to serve the wheelchair accessible units. 142 long stay and 4 short stay parking cycle spaces will be provided.

How has the architectural design been informed?

Plot K1 is a masonry building, influenced by the historical and contemporary context of the area which relies heavily on brick as the predominant building material. A light brick tone is proposed in the façade design and materiality of the building in order to reflect the local context and give the building a bright appearance.

 

The building is six storeys at its maximum height, stepping down to five storeys towards Russia Dock Woodland, creating a contextual response to the surrounding natural environment and ensuring that it is not visible from the main grassed space of Russia Dock Woodland. A series of detailed ecology and overshadowing studies have been undertaken to confirm that the building won’t harm Russia Dock Woodland/Stave Hill Ecology Park or the Alfred Salter school playground and classrooms. These studies confirm there is no significant impact on either and they have been submitted with the revised planning application.

Will the building affect Russia Dock Woodland and Stave Hill Ecological Park?

A series of detailed ecology and overshadowing studies have been undertaken to confirm that the building won’t harm Russia Dock Woodland or Stave Hill Ecology Park.

 

The full overshadowing report for plot K1 can be found in the ‘Overshadowing impacts on neighbours’ report (pages 279-330 in the Environmental Statement – Volume IV – Technical Appendices – 16.1 – Daylight, Sunlight and Overshadowing) whilst the additional studies on ecology impacts area available to download on Southwark Council’s Planning Register (under the ‘Environmental Statement – ADDENDUM – VOLUME III: TECHNICAL APPENDIX 4’).

 

Additional reports were submitted to Southwark Council in October 2018, which conclude that any impacts of overshadowing upon the neighbouring Russia Dock Woodland will be insignificant due to the limited extent of the overshadowing predicted (only towards the end of each day’s daylight period) and the overall minimal reduction in annual sunlight hours (not considered significant) over the majority of the park. In addition, Southwark Council appointed Land Use Consulting to undertake an independent review of the reports, and the review confirmed that impacts of overshadowing would be insignificant.

 

There is no meaningful overshadowing impact on the structured hop planting area within Stave Hill Ecological Park, the orchard area or butterfly area during the summer months of May to July. Furthermore, the additional overshadowing amounts to a reduction of generally less than 10 hours of probable sunlight hours per annum over parts of the structured hop planting area and orchard area only.

 

Queries were also raised about the impact on wildlife within the woodland, specifically including butterflies. The modelling exercise undertaken demonstrates that overshadowing is only predicted at the end of each day’s daylight period, after the butterflies would have generated enough heat to raise their metabolism to fly. The overshadowing impact will therefore not be of a magnitude as to affect the habitat conditions or life cycle stages of butterflies or other species.

Will the building affect Alfred Salter Primary School?

The K1 site neighbours Alfred Salter Primary School and the Masterplan team has been engaging with both the Head teacher and Governors on our proposals.

 

In response to comments received, we have undertaken a series of detailed overshadowing studies which confirm that the building won’t significantly impact the Alfred Salter playground and classrooms. The full overshadowing report for plot K1 can be found in the ‘Overshadowing impacts on neighbours’ report (pages 279-330 in the Environmental Statement – Volume IV – Technical Appendices – 16.1 – Daylight, Sunlight and Overshadowing).

 

In response to a request, we have developed additional visualisations showing the view of the development from the school site. These can be accessed here. We acknowledge that the outlook from the school grounds will change, as it would with any development over one storey located on the currently vacant K1 site. Whilst the development would be visible from the school grounds the impact is not significant, as the school is already overlooked by the recently completed Claremont House and homes on Archangel Street adjacent to the school running track area. The resulting condition is not unusual in the context of its inner-London location, and similar to other local schools which also experience overlooking from residential development adjacent to their sites.

Will the building affect Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception Catholic Church?

The scheme causes some limited overshadowing to the car park of Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception Catholic Church, but of a level that falls within acceptable policy guidance limits.

 

The full overshadowing report for plot K1 can be found in the ‘Overshadowing impacts on neighbours’ report (pages 279-330 in the Environmental Statement – Volume IV – Technical Appendices – 16.1 – Daylight, Sunlight and Overshadowing).

 

How will you ensure development of K1 supports public safety and minimises risk of crime?

We believe more active and busy streets are a key part of addressing the safety in local streets and spaces. The Masterplan’s public realm is designed in a way that naturally encourages safety and security, and we will implement security measures such as CCTV and active management to help monitor the area and keep it safe.

 

In regards to K1, We have consciously designed the scheme to improve safety within and around the borders of the site. The edge bordering Russia Walk will not be a blank alleyway. It will have windows, balconies, and terraces facing out that provide critical surveillance through “eyes on the street.” This will be a significant improvement over the current state of an empty lot with a fence. The communal courtyard of K1 faces south east towards the woodland to provide views and visual permeability (again, increasing surveillance to Russia Walk), but will be fenced on the south eastern edge, so will not provide direct access to or from the woodland that could present a safety risk.

How has British Land consulted on Plot K1 to date?

British Land has been consulting on the Canada Water Masterplan since 2014. A summary of consultation on Plot K1 to date is below:

 

  • December 2014: Land at Roberts Close was shown with use to be decided and potential for community use.
  • February 2016: Public consultation on the Draft Masterplan and principles of land at Roberts Close as a residential building, with the height to be determined.
  • May 2017: Public consultation began on the Updated Draft Masterplan, with land at Roberts Close as residential use and of medium height between 6-10 storeys. The land was also considered by Southwark Council as one of three locations for a replacement leisure centre (During the consultation, Plot A2 became the preferred option for the leisure centre over Plot K1).
  • January 2018: Public consultation was held on detailed design proposals for Plot K1 as a 5-6 storey residential building.
  • March 2018: The design team held a dedicated session with the site’s neighbours to specifically discuss the proposals for K1 as a 5-6 storey residential building.
  • June 2018: The design team held a dedicated session with residents living in direct proximity to the site to discuss the planning application for Plot K1, as a 5-6 storey residential building.
  • November 2018: A dedicated drop-in session for residents of neighbouring Claremont House (recently occupied) was held by the design team.
  • September 2019: Southwark Council’s planning committee unanimously resolved to grant planning permission for the Masterplan, including Plot K1.
  • Ongoing: British Land and the project team continue to hold one to one meetings with direct neighbours as requested.

 

Since 2014 our website has been updated to show the latest designs as well as all consultation materials and documents. All consultation materials can be found on our Downloads page.

4.5. INTERIM PETROL FILLING STATION
Why has a detailed application for an interim petrol filling station been submitted in the first plots?

In order to build the proposed building at Plot A2, the existing Tesco petrol station in the Surrey Quays Shopping Centre car park has to be relocated. The proposed location of the interim Petrol Filling Station in the southern section of the existing Surrey Quays Shopping Centre car park creates a well-defined area for it which will ensure minimal disruption to Surrey Quays Shopping Centre and the associated surface car park as well as being in close proximity to the existing Tesco Superstore entrance.

What are the proposals for the interim petrol filling station and how will you maintain links between Surrey Quays Shopping Centre and Lower Road?

We are proposing to build an eight-pump interim petrol filling station, similar to the existing petrol filling station.

 

Following meetings with local residents and feedback from Lower Road businesses, we included enhanced planting along the south and west edge of the forecourt to screen it. Alongside the Interim petrol filling station we will also provide a more direct and planted pedestrian route to improve the link between the shops on Lower Road and the main car park and shopping centre.

How has British Land consulted on the interim petrol filling station to date?

British Land has been consulting on the Canada Water Masterplan since 2014. A summary of consultation on the Interim Petrol Filling Station to date is below:

 

  • January 2018: Public exhibitions presenting two potential locations for the Interim Petrol Filling Station, including the Interim Petrol Filling Station.
  • June 2018: Drop-in sessions were held following planning application submission, presenting the Interim Petrol Filling Station in its current location.
  • November 2018: British Land and the project team held a dedicated session with the Osprey Estate Tenants and Residents’ Association to discuss the proposals following the submission of a detailed planning application.
  • September 2019: Southwark Council’s planning committee unanimously resolved to grant planning permission for the Masterplan, including the interim petrol filling station and Plot K1.
  • Ongoing: British Land and the project team continue to hold one to one meetings with direct neighbours as requested.

 

Since 2014 our website has been updated to show the latest designs as well as all consultation materials and documents. All consultation materials can be found on our Downloads page.

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What is the difference between the Southwark Council planning committee resolution to grant planning permission in September 2019, and the planning permission issued in May 2020?

In September 2019 Southwark Council’s Planning Committee unanimously resolved to grant planning permission for the Masterplan, subject to being referred to the Mayor of London and signing of various legal agreements, most notably the Section 106 agreement.

 

In February 2020 the Mayor of London also endorsed the scheme allowing Southwark Council to determine the application itself.

 

British Land has since been working with Southwark Council and TfL to agree the final Section 106 agreement, which was signed in May 2020. This is a legally binding agreement that sets out the infrastructure, facilities and wider benefits we will deliver as well as commitments to drive local employment and provide discounted retail and workspace.

 

With the Section 106 now signed and the planning permission issued, we are in a position to discharge of pre commencement conditions and specific obligations in the s106 as required to start works on site.

What is a Reserved Matters Application and when will they be submitted?

Phase 1 of the planning permission was submitted in ‘detail’, that is to say all details were provided at the application stage.  The remainder of the planning application was submitted in ‘outline’ to establish the principles of the development, such as maximum building height and use, but allow for other details to be ‘reserved’ for future determination. This includes things like the appearance of a building or public realm, the means of access, landscaping proposals, and internal layouts. A Reserved Matters Application provides these additional details.

 

Reserved Matters Applications will be prepared for future plots within the Masterplan, and we will carry out community engagement on them as they come forward. Applications will also need to be submitted to Southwark Council for their approval.

When will you start construction? How long will it take?

Initial preparatory construction works are due to begin on three parts of the Canada Water Masterplan site from October 2020 – see our Latest News piece on this.

 

The target date for the completion of the Masterplan is 2034.

How will you manage the construction phases and keep the community informed throughout?

A Construction Management Plan for the whole Masterplan, as well as the first detailed plots, was included as part of the planning application, setting out the principles and proposed construction approach.

 

Once a contractor has been appointed they will develop a construction methodology to ensure that the Construction Management Plan is followed and that disruption is minimised where possible.

 

We have appointed a dedicated Construction Neighbourhood Liaison Manager to honour our commitment to minimise disruption for local residents, businesses and people who work and visit the area. The Construction Neighbourhood Liaison Manager will ensure that neighbours are kept regularly updated and will respond promptly to any issues or questions that arise. If you have any questions about these works or would like to speak with the Construction Neighbourhood Liaison Manager, please contact team@canadawater.mc-staging.net or call 0800 470 4593 (freephone).

 

Neighbours living near locations where construction activity is taking place will receive regular newsletters and have regular opportunities to speak with the Construction Neighbourhood Liaison Manager and relevant contractor. We will also send regular updates as these works progress via this e-newsletter, web updates, social media posts and site signage.

Will British Land sell the sites once they have been developed?

British Land is a long-term investor in places and it is not part of our business model to sell on our larger assets once we have planning permission – we tend to then build our projects out.

 

Our track record can already been seen across our development portfolio, including at our 13-acre Regent’s Place campus, which is home to over 20,000 workers and residents.

 

In demonstrating our commitment to the area, we have for the past five years invested great time and resource in supporting the local community around Canada Water, including businesses, education institutions and community organisations.

How has British Land been consulting with the community? When will you be consulting again?

Community consultation started in Spring 2014, and between then and Summer 2019 we held over 120 public consultation and local outreach events, with a total attendance of more than 11,000. We would like to thank everybody who contributed their valuable time and ideas to the discussions, which directly informed, and in some cases changed, the plans.

 

In May 2020 Southwark Council granted planning permission for the Masterplan, which means we are now able to start the next phase in delivering the Masterplan. We remain committed to maintaining local involvement in the long term, during delivery of the Masterplan, and as a committed long-term partner and neighbour.

 

This will include undertaking engagement as part of future Reserved Matters Applications (“RMAs” – to approve the detailed design of future buildings and spaces) on new buildings and the plans for key areas such as the park and the dock, as well as as ensuring that your input continues to inform what we do to ensure that the Masterplan delivers social, economic and health benefits

 

We will also continue to be active, contactable, and visible by engaging directly with neighbours and the wider community through meetings, events, newsletters, notice boards or other means.

Where can we review the planning documents?

The planning documents that were submitted as part of the Canada Water Masterplan application (which Southwark Council granted planning permission for in May 2020) are available to view on Southwark Council’s  Online Planning Register by searching case reference number 18/AP/1604 or by searching for ‘Canada Water Masterplan’. The planning documents are also available to view at Canada Water Library upon request.

 

A selection of key planning documents are also available on the Canada Water Masterplan website with an explanation of the planning process. If you have any further questions, please get in touch with us.

6.1 TREE AND LANDSCAPE WORKS
What works have you undertaken / are you going to undertake?

In early Spring 2019 we carried out a number of tree works which included pollarding (cutting foliage back to branches), canopy reduction and in some limited instances the removal of a small number of trees. A map and information pack is available here outlining the few trees/shrubs affected, alongside further details of the works.

 

In February and March 2020, we undertook further work on number of trees around the Surrey Quays Shopping Centre car park. These were part of a series of early works to enable the first phases of construction on the Canada Water Masterplan. More information is available here and provides full information on the works that took place.

 

Following the granting of planning permission for the Canada Water Masterplan in May 2020, initial preparatory works began on three parts of the Canada Water Masterplan site in October 2020.

 

For more information on the preparatory works being carried out and the tree works that are associated with this, please see the latest news piece here.

When will you replace the trees removed?

Loss of any trees will be temporary, as additional planting will be undertaken in 2020 to replace any trees removed, and by 2023 the full landscaping works for Phase 1 of the Canada Water Masterplan along the dock edge are expected to be completed.

 

For more information regarding on site and off-site tree planting associated with the Canada Water Masterplan, please view this section of the FAQs.

How can I get in touch with the team about the works?

British Land has appointed a dedicated Construction Neighoburhood Liaison Manager to honour our commitment to minimise disruption for local residents, businesses and people who work and visit the area.

 

The Construction Neighbourhood Liaison Manager will ensure that neighbours are kept regularly updated and will respond promtly to any issues or questions that arise. If you have any questions about these works or would like to speak with the Construction Neighbourhood Liaison Manager, please contact team@canadawater.mc-staging.net or call 0800 470 4593 (freephone).

 

Neighbours living near locations where construction activity is taking place will receive regular newsletters anad have regular opportunities to speak with the Construction Neighbourhood Liaison Manager and relevant contractors. We will also send regular updates as these works progress via our e-newsletters, web updates, social media posts and site signage.

6.2 GAS NETWORK DIVERSION
What works are you undertaking?

We are working with SGN to divert the gas main pipe which is located under Surrey Quays Shopping Centre car park. The works will take place in phases in order to minimise disruption.

Why are these taking place?

These works will move the gas main pipe to facilitate the construction of the first phases of the Canada Water Masterplan.

When will the works take place?

Works began at the end of May 2019 and are scheduled to complete in autumn 2020.

What hours of the day will work be taking places?

Engineers will be working Monday to Friday between 8am and 6pm, and on Saturdays between 9am and 4pm. In consultation with Southwark Council, SGN have agreed to work extended hours on Saturdays, to complete the gas main diversion as soon as possible.

What areas will be impacted?

This news post provides detail on the current work area and associated pedestrian and vehicle diversions in place.

Will there be disruption to gas supplies?

Local gas supplies will not be disrupted during these works.

Do you need planning permission to undertake these works?

Authority to divert the gas main pipe is permitted under the powers SGN has as a statutory utility undertaker.

Who are SGN and who is the contractor that is undertaking the works?

SGN manage the network that distributes natural and green gas to 5.9 million homes and businesses across Scotland and the south of England. For more information visit www.sgn.co.uk/About-SGN/

 

Contractor JDT Utilities are undertaking this work on SGN’s behalf.

How do I get in touch if I have any further questions or queries?

If you have any questions or concerns in advance of or during the works, please email team@canadawater.mc-staging.net or call the Canada Water Masterplan team on 0800 470 4593 (Monday-Friday, 9am-6pm). When appropriate, calls will be diverted to SGN’s customer contact centre, where they are best placed to answer any questions. In the event of an emergency (smelling gas for example) please call the National Gas Emergency Number on 0800 111 999.

Why did you build a buttress wall at the Eastern end of Hothfield Place?

The buttress wall (brick box) needs to be built to support and protect a new gas main pipeline that Southern Gas Network (SGN) is diverting through Surrey Quays Shopping Centre car park, as it changes levels from the car park down onto Hothfield Place. More information on the gas main pipe diversion can be found in the questions above.

6.3 PREPARATORY CONSTRUCTION WORKS
What construction works are you undertaking?

Initial preparatory construction works are due to begin on three parts of the Canada Water Masterplan site from October 2020. Work site area one is at the rear of Printworks on Quebec Way, work site areas two and three and in the Surrey Quays Shopping Centre Car Park – see Latest News post for more information.

Who are the contractors?

Galldris have been appointed to carefully deconstruct the three unused steel buildings at the rear of the Printworks site as well as carry out a series of infrastructure works in the shopping centre car park. Keltbray will build the new interim petrol filling station for Tesco.

When will they take place?

Work to carefully deconstruct the three unused steel buildings at the rear of the Printworks site is underway and expected to be complete in early 2021. The infrastructure works in the shopping centre car park are underway and expected to be complete in the middle of 2021. The works to build a new interim petrol filling station began on 26 October and are expected to complete in summer 2021.

What hours of the day will works be taking place?

Working hours for construction and demolition work as permitted by Southwark Council are:

 

  • Monday to Friday 8am to 6pm
  • Saturdays 9am to 2pm
  • No works on Sundays or Bank Holidays

 

Where work is taking place on site that does not fall into the ‘construction and demolition’ category (surveys for example), and therefore can take place outside of the above hours, we will communicate this via site signage.

Will Surrey Quays Shopping Centre and Surrey Quays Leisure Park remain open during these works?

The initial preparatory works will be undertaken in a way that allows the Shopping Centre and Leisure Park to continue trading as usual. Visitors will see some changes to the car parking arrangements at the Shopping Centre, but these will be clearly signposted on site.

Do you need planning permission to undertake these works?

These initial preparatory works are permitted by Southwark Council largely via discharging planning conditions associated with the outline planning consent.

How do I get in touch if I have any further questions or queries?

British Land has appointed a dedicated Construction Neighoburhood Liaison Manager to honour our commitment to minimise disruption for local residents, businesses and people who work and visit the area.

 

The Construction Neighbourhood Liaison Manager will ensure that neighbours are kept regularly updated and will respond promtly to any issues or questions that arise. If you have any questions about these works or would like to speak with the Construction Neighbourhood Liaison Manager, please contact team@canadawater.mc-staging.net or call 0800 470 4593 (freephone).

 

Neighbours living near locations where construction activity is taking place will receive regular newsletters anad have regular opportunities to speak with the Construction Neighbourhood Liaison Manager and relevant contractors. We will also send regular updates as these works progress via our e-newsletters, web updates, social media posts and site signage.

7.1. RESERVED MATTERS APPLICATIONS AND ONGOING ENGAGEMENT
Will there be future engagement opportunities on the Masterplan?

We’re committed to maintaining local involvement throughout the construction period and beyond

 

This will include undertaking engagement as part of future Reserved Matters Applications (“RMAs” – to approve the detailed design of future buildings and spaces) as well as ensuring that your input continues to inform what we do to ensure that the Masterplan delivers social, economic and health benefits. As part of this, we will be exploring the ongoing opportunities for the community to be involved in shaping the new town centre.

 

We will also continue to meet with Southwark Council, Transport for London, the Greater London Authority, local stakeholders, neighbours of the site and residents – as we have done in respect of this application. We will also continue to attend community events and meetings.

 

Please get in touch with the team if you have any questions or would like more information.

What is a ‘Reserved Matters Application’ (RMA) and how will these be consulted on?

Planning permission for The Canada Water Masterplan was granted in a hybrid form whereby the first four buildings were approved concurrently in detail.

 

The remainder of the development has been approved in outline and establishes the parameters within which future buildings and spaces can come forward, such as the maximum building height and permitted uses for each Masterplan ‘Zone’. All other matters are reserved for future determination through subsequent Reserved Matters Applications. Each RMA will then be considered by Southwark Council’s Planning Committee.

 

There will be further engagement on each RMA as it comes forward, and within time this will include key public spaces such as the new park and Canada Water Dock. British Land is committed to keeping local people updated as further RMAs are prepared and will be active, contactable and visible by engaging directly with neighbours and the wider community through meetings, events, newsletters, noticeboards and other means.

 

Once the Reserved Matters Application has been validated by Southwark Council, they will hold a 21-day Statutory Consultation period during which you will be able to provide comments to the Council for their consideration. Each RMA will then be considered by Southwark Council’s Planning Committee.

 

In addition to this, we are also committed to working collaboratively with the local community on numerous other areas as the Masterplan that are not related to planning, such as around social regeneration priorities.

 

You can find out more about our ongoing going engagement with the local community and our communications charter setting out how we will respond and engage with people by visiting here.

7.2 A NEW BELOW GROUND ELECTRICITY SUBSTATION (ZONE L)
What is being proposed?

British Land and UK Power Networks (UKPN) have submitted a Reserved Matters Application to Southwark Council for a new below ground electricity substation at Canada Water.

 

An electricity substation is an important piece of local infrastructure that connects electricity from the National Power Grid and transforms it into safe voltages to distribute to homes and businesses. They can range in size and design and are commonly constructed underground or co-located with other buildings.

 

The new substation at Canada Water is being introduced to meet the future electrical needs of the Masterplan, the wider local area, and to reinforce electricity supply in other areas of the Borough.

 

The ‘Reserved Matters Application’ (RMA) covers an area known as ‘Zone L’ of the Canada Water Masterplan (at the back of the Printworks site near to Quebec Way) and this process follows the decision by Southwark Council to grant planning permission for the Masterplan in May 2020. The permission in May established the parameters within which the Zone can be developed, and the RMA that has been submitted is in conformity with these approved parameters. British Land is therefore seeking approval for the detailed design, proposed appearance, layout and scale of the substation.

 

It will be connected to the National Grid through underground cables to New Cross electricity substation. The primary type of electricity substation proposed allows electrical equipment to be completely enclosed within a building, and for it to be co-located with other buildings in the future.

 

Southwark Council has allocated the planning application a case reference number of 20/AP/2495 and is now holding a period of statutory consultation period on the proposals.

What is currently on the site where the electricity substation will be built?

The substation will be located at the back of the Printworks site near Quebec Way. It will replace a number of small ancillary buildings, most of which are now out of use.

How big will the electricity substation be?

The substation will be built below ground and will be approximately 10m deep and 40m wide. The ventilation shaft will however be the only visible part of the building above ground, measuring approximately 9m long, 7m wide and 4-6m tall.

Why are the plans for a new energy substation being brought forward now?

Demand for energy in the local area is expected to increase as a result of a number of new developments coming forward in Southwark, including but not limited to the Canada Water Masterplan.

 

For this reason, is necessary to progress a Reserved Matters Planning Application now, to ensure future energy demands are met in the wider area, as the development of the electricity substation will take up to three years to construct and become operational.

Who is the project team behind these proposals?

British Land is working in partnership with UK Power Networks (UKPN), the UK’s largest electricity distributor, to deliver the new below ground electricity substation in Canada Water. Once constructed, UKPN will own and manage the electricity substation that will be located within Zone L.

 

UKPN owns and maintains electricity cables and lines across London, the South East and East of England. UKPN’s networks deliver electricity to 19 million people across the United Kingdom, including to 8.3 million homes and businesses, powering 29% of the UK’s population.

 

UKPN are a distribution network operator and manage the distribution and connection of power and electricity to your home.

What is the location for this new substation and why has it been chosen?

The Masterplan planning application identified two possible locations for the electricity substation, in either ‘Zone L’ or ‘Zone E’. British Land, UKPN and the design teams carefully assessed these two options and it was deemed that Zone E was unsuitable for immediate construction as it is currently occupied by the existing Tesco superstore. As such, it is unavailable for development in time to meet future capacity demands.

 

Therefore, substation will be located within ‘Zone L’ of the Canada Water Masterplan, at the back of the Printworks site near to Quebec Way. The proposed site is not on publicly accessible land and is currently home to a number of ancillary buildings, which will be demolished. You can see a detailed map of the location for the new substation on the exhibition boards here.

 

British Land has worked closely with UKPN to ensure that the location and design of the substation within Zone L is consistent with the Masterplan Development Specifications and follows the principles set out in the Parameter Plans.

 

The planning permission for the Canada Water Masterplan also includes new homes on Zone L, which will be designed at a later date. The location of the substation has been carefully positioned within Zone L to ensure that future homes can be accommodated around the structure. The designs for new homes on Zone L will require a separate Reserved Matters Application, which will be shared at a subsequent date.

What is the timeline for delivery of the new substation?

British Land and UK Power Networks (UKPN) have submitted a Reserved Matters Application to Southwark Council for the new electricity substation.

 

Southwark Council has allocated the planning application a case reference number of 20/AP/2495 and is now holding a 28-day statutory consultation period on the proposals between 29 September and 27 October.

 

The statutory consultation period is the opportunity for you to view all the planning documents and provide a formal comment directly to Southwark Council. Your comments will then be taken into consideration by Council in their determination of the planning application.

 

You can find all the application documents and make your formal comments on the application by visiting Southwark Council’s Planning Register at planning.southwark.gov.uk/online-applications/ using the case reference number 20/AP/2495.

 

Subject to planning permission, it is expected that preliminary works could begin in the autumn once the application has been approved, with the construction of the substation box commencing in early 2021. In total it is expected that the works to build the substation itself, the box that it will sit in and the process of relaying electricity cables to reach the station will take three years and be completed in the winter of 2023.

What is the process for constructing the new electricity substation?

The substation will be brought forward in three phases:

 

  1. Site preparation and demolition – To build the new electricity substation, preliminary demolition and excavation works are required before construction can start. British Land’s contractors will carry out these works, which will involve demolishing some of the existing buildings at the rear of the Printworks building and then excavating land to accommodate the underground substation box. Existing trees along Quebec Way will be maintained to keep screening. Once the site has been prepared, construction of the substation box will begin. These types of works are common practice across the UK and do not result in any noticeable effects to power supply for local residents.
  2. Temporary condition – Following the completion of the substation box, UKPN’s contractor will then begin to install cables (Phase 2) and connect the substation to the National Power Grid. Once constructed, the electricity substation will be securely enclosed and accessed only by UKPN staff via the existing gate from Quebec Way with secure fencing maintained throughout construction. British Land is committed to maintaining the existing tree line and landscaping around the site in the medium term.
  3. Permanent condition – By submerging the electricity substation, British Land can continue, in line with the planning permission for the Canada Water Masterplan, to redevelop the Zone L to provide new housing in the future. Over the coming years, British Land will be bringing forward plans for new housing on Zone L, which will require a subsequent Reserved Matters Application.
What will be the visual impact of the substation on the area and on Quebec Way?

The substation will be built below ground. The main ventilation shaft will be the only visible portion of the building above ground, measuring approximately 9m long, 7m wide and 4-6m tall.

Will the substation be noisy?

The substation will not be noisy when in operation. The equipment needs to be designed and installed to standards set out within the Masterplan planning permission.

 

During construction there will naturally be some noise associated with the works. As such a site-specific Construction Management Plan (CMP) for delivering the substation on Zone L has been submitted as part of the Reserved Matters Planning Application to ensure local considerations are appropriately managed.

 

This considers key matters such as noise and restrictions on construction hours to ensure that local neighbours are not unreasonably impacted during construction. The CMP can be viewed online on Southwark’s planning portal.

Is it a usual practice for a substation to be underground?

Yes, there are many of precedents for covering a substation – in fact it is common practice and although it is more expensive to build a substation below ground, it is much more beneficial for local residents.

 

Morton Street in Pimlico, for example, is a larger substation that has been covered with a play space on the roof.  Brown Hart Gardens in Mayfair sits adjacent to residential buildings.  Leicester Square also has a similar size substation below the square.

How will you manage construction works to mitigate the impacts on neighbours?

British Land is committed to being a considerate neighbour during the construction process and already has a proven track record with 28 National Site Awards for its highly considerate work.

 

British Land’s construction partners and contractors sign up to the Considerate Constructors Scheme ensuring that there is a commitment to take measures that minimise the impact of key factors such as vibration, air, noise and dust and pollution.

 

A Framework Construction Management Plan was approved as part of the overall Masterplan which sets out the guiding principles for the proposed construction approach within the Canada Water Masterplan.

 

In addition, a site-specific Construction Management Plan for delivering the substation on Zone L has been submitted as part of the Reserved Matters Planning Application to ensure local considerations are appropriately managed. It will consider key matters such as noise and restrictions on construction hours to ensure that local neighbours are not unreasonably impacted during construction. The CMP can be viewed online on Southwark’s planning portal.

 

For reference, Southwark Council’s standard permitted working hours are 08:00 to 18:00 Monday to Friday and 08:00 to 13:00 on Saturdays.

How will you be liaising with neighbours during the construction process?

British Land is committed to providing regular construction updates, and we will ensure that we listen to the views of those who are most directly affected by construction activity, ensuring the opportunity for regular contact with contractors and British Land throughout Construction.

 

Neighbours will receive frequent newsletters with project updates, which will also be displayed on site noticeboards and via other means. In addition, we will provide a designated point of contact for any issues during construction, as well as a 24-hour hotline.

 

British Land will also establish a Construction Liaison Group that will meet regularly. Contractors will attend these groups to share programme updates and address any questions or concerns that neighbours may experience through the construction process.

 

As part of the Considerate Constructors Scheme, British Land contractors and UKPN will prepare a community communications plan that establishes the communication protocols and how they will keep local residents informed about ongoing project updates and how to get in touch if any issues arise.

 

Throughout construction of the Canada Water Masterplan, British Land is also committed to providing bespoke employment and training programmes for local people to access employment opportunities.

 

It is anticipated that c.1,200 construction jobs will be generated throughout the construction of the Masterplan. In the short term, to 2024, there will be career and training opportunities for Southwark and local residents in construction roles, with training courses and opportunities to gain apprentice/ NVQ-level qualifications.

How will construction vehicles access the site?

The site will be accessed via Quebec Way, and all heavy goods vehicles associated with these works will access Quebec Way via Redriff Road rather than Canada Street, to reduce impact on Alfred Salter Primary School. A site-specific Construction Management Plan for delivering the substation on Zone L has been submitted as part of the Reserved Matters Planning Application that will confirm these arrangements, and can be viewed online on Southwark’s planning portal.

Will my power supply be affected during the works?

These types of works are common practice across the UK and do not result in any noticeable effects to power supply for local residents.

What will the wider construction impacts be of these works – will other parts of the borough be affected when they begin to lay the cables?

There will be points at which certain roads may be affected while the new cabling is laid, although we won’t be able to give full details of this until planning permission has been granted. Any road closure works will be agreed between Southwark Council and UKPN.

 

If local roads do have to be closed then there will be advanced notice and measures put in place to mitigate the impact – as with all major construction works.

Will construction works affect access into Claremont House or the Quebec Quarter?

It is not envisaged that there will be any impact on access to these properties.

Do you have to remove any of the existing foliage around the site in order to build the substation?

The existing trees along Quebec Way will be maintained for as long as possible to keep screening. British land will also work with an ecologist to ensure that there is no adverse effect on local wildlife as a result of these works.

Are there any safety risks for local people by building this substation?

No – safety and regulation standards around power and energy in the UK are exceptionally high and the proposed electricity substation does not pose any health or safety risks to local residents.

 

UKPN and British Land have commissioned an independent report, from the National Grid, to assess the effect of the substation on the local area. This found that the proposed equipment and cabling associated with the underground substation is fully compliant with the Government policy and that “the general public, local residents on Quebec Way, local children at Alfred Salters School and future residents living in new housing provided on the Canada Water Masterplan site will not be affected by the proposed substation / cabling.”

 

Across the UK many schools and homes are located near to substations, often without people even being aware. For example, there are already 20 electricity substations that already serve the Canada Water Masterplan area, located above and below ground.

Who will maintain and look after this substation to ensure the safety of local people?

Once constructed, the electricity substation will be maintained and managed by UKPN. The site will be secured with highly restricted access and monitored 24/7 by CCTV.

How can I comment on the proposals?

The Reserved Matters Planning Application for the electricity substation on Zone L is being made following the decision by Southwark Council to grant planning permission for the Canada Water Masterplan in May 2020. The permission in May established the parameters within which the zone can be developed, as well as the outline uses. The Reserved Matters Planning Application is being brought forward in conformity with these approved parameters and we are seeking approval for the detailed design, proposed appearance, layout and scale of the Substation.

 

British Land and UK Power Networks (UKPN) have submitted a Reserved Matters Application to Southwark Council for the new electricity substation.

 

Southwark Council has allocated the planning application a case reference number of 20/AP/2495 and is now holding a period of statutory consultation period on the proposals between 29 September and 27 October. You may have already received a letter from Southwark Council about this already.

 

The statutory consultation period is the opportunity for you to view all the planning documents and provide a formal comment directly to Southwark Council. Your comments will then be taken into consideration by Council in their determination of the planning application.

 

You can find all the application documents and make your formal comments on the application by visiting Southwark Council’s Planning Register at planning.southwark.gov.uk/online-applications/ using the case reference number 20/AP/2495.

 

We have also updated the electricity substation virtual exhibition (please visit exhibition.app) with further information about how you can view the planning documents, get in touch with the project team, or view frequently asked questions. From the exhibition, you can also continue to view the information about the proposals that was shared with the local community between 10 – 19 July 2020. If you would like to receive printed copies of the information available in the virtual exhibition please get in touch.

How have the proposals for the energy substation been consulted on previously?

In May 2020 Southwark Council granted planning permission for the Canada Water Masterplan, following four years of consultation during which over 12,000 comments were received with feedback informing each stage of the Masterplan’s development.

 

The hybrid planning application that was granted approval established the parameters within which the zone can be developed, as well as the outline uses. This included use as an electricity substation. These plans can be found in the Development Specification (June 2019) and Utilities and Service Infrastructure Strategy (May 2018) that were submitted as part of the hybrid planning application.

 

Southwark Council undertook statutory consultation on the planning application prior to its approval, during which period all planning application documents were available to view on their planning register. Alongside this, British Land held several drop-in events at the Canada Water Masterplan hub and other local venues, as well as giving presentations to local groups such as Canada Water Consultative Forum, where members of the team were on hand to discuss the proposals.

7.3. TEMPORARY INNOVATION HUB
What are the proposals for the temporary innovation hub?

British Land is proposing a phased, new 2-3 storey temporary innovation hub. TEDI-London, a design-led higher education engineering provider co-founded by King’s College London, Arizona State University and University of New South Wales in Sydney, will anchor the innovation hub.

 

The hub is designed by internationally renowned architect Hawkins\Brown, and will be located in a currently underused private car park that forms part of the Printworks compound. As a modular construction, most of the will be built off-site, enabling British Land to minimise disruption to the local area.

 

The innovation hub will be built in phases. At first, one building will be built at the corner of Quebec Way and Teredo Street, to accommodate TEDI-London’s first cohort of students from 2021. Future buildings (up to a total of four) would then come forward at a later date to house expansion space for TEDI-London to grow, or other interim facilities associated with the Canada Water Masterplan. For sketches of the proposed design please see our exhibition boards.

 

A temporary permission for 7 years is being sought, and the hub would help bring to life an underused area of the site and help bring learning opportunities for the local community.

 

In the medium-term, British Land plans to provide a permanent higher education cluster within the wider Canada Water Masterplan site, to house TEDI-London alongside other institutions.

 

We are currently seeking views on the plans before a planning application is submitted later in the summer. You can find out more about the plans by visiting the dedicated engagement portal, here: https://cwm.exhibition.app/.

What is the timeline for the delivery of the Temporary Innovation Hub?

British Land has submitted a planning application to Southwark Council.

 

Southwark Council has allocated the planning application a case reference number of 20/AP/2482 and is now holding a 28-day statutory consultation period on the proposals between 29 September and 27 October.

 

The statutory consultation period is the opportunity for you to view all the planning documents and provide a formal comment directly to Southwark Council. Your comments will then be taken into consideration by Council in their determination of the planning application.

 

You can find all the application documents and make your formal comments on the application by visiting Southwark Council’s Planning Register at www.planning.southwark.gov.uk/online-applications/ using the case reference number 20/AP/2482.

 

The project will be brought forward in phases. At first, one building will be built at the corner of Quebec Way and Teredo Street, to accommodate TEDI-London’s first cohort of students from 2021. Future buildings (up to a total of four) would then come forward at a later date to house expansion space for TEDI-London to grow, or other interim facilities associated with the Canada Water Masterplan.

Where is the site for the temporary innovation hub and what is it currently home to?

The site is currently an underused private car park which is part of the Printworks compound, located on the corner of Quebec Way and Teredo Street. The new hub will bring to life underused space currently not available to the public.

 

There is some existing foliage on the site along Quebec Way, which will remain in place and we are working with an ecological expert to ensure that there will be no adverse effect on local wildlife.

Why are the proposals being brought forward now?

British Land is bringing this temporary innovation hub forward now to ensure that it can be open in time for TEDI-London to welcome its first cohort of degree students arriving in 2021.

Are the proposals related to the Canada Water Masterplan?

A standalone planning application has been submitted, which is entirely separate from the Canada Water Masterplan. This planning application will be submitted to Southwark Council and is entirely separate from the Canada Water Masterplan.
The temporary innovation hub will only remain on the proposed site for seven years, establishing a centre of innovation and knowledge in Canada Water before the rest of the Masterplan is brought forward, building on the vision of British Land and Southwark Council to bring a higher education offer to the area.
In the medium-term, British Land plans to provide a permanent higher education cluster within the wider Canada Water Masterplan site, to house TEDI-London alongside other institutions.

Why is a temporary 7 year planning permission being sought?

The temporary innovation hub has been designed to be used for seven years.

 

This will allow British Land to provide a shorter-term space for TEDI-London in time for when the first cohort of students arrive in 2021. The flexible design will allow the innovation hub to then grow as TEDI-London expands with further cohorts of students.

 

The temporary innovation hub would be in place for 7 years, after which British Land plans to develop the site as part of the separate Canada Water Masterplan proposals. At this point, British Land also plans to provide a permanent higher education cluster within the wider Canada Water Masterplan site, to house TEDI-London alongside other institutions.

What is the size of the temporary innovation hub?

The initial building (provision of one building on the corner of Teredo Street and Quebec Way to house TEDI-London) would be 1,370m sq in size, and once the entire site is developed the hub will cover just over 6,000m sq in total (Gross External Area – the measure of the whole are of a building taking each floor into account).

What will the new hub look like?

At first, one building will be constructed on the corner of Quebec Way and Teredo Street, to house the first cohort of TEDI-London students.

 

A further three buildings would be built at later dates to provide space for TEDI-London to expand, or for other interim uses associated with the Canada Water Masterplan. Each building will also be 2-3 storeys in height.

 

In its final form, the four buildings will be arranged in a grid like pattern. There will be a central pedestrian thoroughfare connecting the buildings and linking through to a landscaped green open space at the main entrance on Quebec Way.

 

The buildings and fence line will be set back a considerable distance from Quebec Way (complying with planning policy), and the majority of existing trees along Quebec Way will be retained, reducing potential impact for neighbours.

 

There will be publicly accessible green space at the interface between the hub and Quebec Way, and green accessible roofs will provide amenity for users of the hub and increase the ‘green feel’ for everyone.

 

The buildings will be clad in timber, referencing the local area’s timber trade and docks heritage.

Is timber a safe building material to use?

Timber is durable, renewable and has a low carbon footprint, meaning that it is highly sustainable. The modular structure and walls will be made from non-combustible construction protecting occupants; while the timber will be utilised as a visual cladding or screen around the buildings. This timber will be coated with a special fire retarding coating that has been designed to reduce the spread of flames in the unlikely event of a fire.

What visual impact will the development have on residential properties living nearby, including those living on Quebec Way?

The temporary innovation hub is set back from Quebec Way and at its maximum will only be three storeys in height, meaning that it will not have any meaningful impact on nearby residential properties.

 

This impact will be assessed in full within the Design and Access Statement (DAS) that will be submitted as part of the planning application. British Land will provide further details of how this can be viewed online once the application has been validated by Southwark Council.

 

When the planning application has been submitted, Southwark Council will carry out a 21-day statutory consultation period on the plans. During this time you will be able to make comments on the proposals to its planning department.

Will you have to remove any of the trees or foliage along Quebec Way?

The majority of trees along Quebec Way will be retained, aside from a small section to create an access route to the site. Retaining the majority of the tree line in this way will reduce overlooking for those living in the vicinity of the site.

 

Any tree works that are undertaken will be done in consultation with an ecologist, to mitigate against any harmful impacts to local wildlife.

 

Overall we are seeking to increase onsite biodiversity and greening through the creation of a publicly accessible green space at the interface between the hub and Quebec Way, as well as green accessible roofs.

Will the temporary innovation hub have an impact on the local transport network?

A transport statement, which studies any potential impact of the proposals on the local transport network, has been prepared and submitted as part of the planning application. The transport statement has found that there will be no significant impact on the area as a result of these plans. You can view the Transport Statement and send any comments directly to Southwark Council during the statutory consultation period, which is currently taking place, by visiting their planning portal here and searching the reference no. 20/AP/2482.

Where will the entrances to the hub be located and what vehicular access are you providing?

The main pedestrian and cycle entrance will be located on the north corner of the site on Quebec Way. It is deliberately offset from Quebec Way to create a vibrant social and public space on this corner.

 

In addition, there will be a further entrance along Teredo Street which will have a ramp to allow for vehicle access if required for servicing and for those who are unable to walk or cycle. Our aim is to ensure however that the development remains car free as far as possible.

Will there be bars, restaurants and cafes in addition to learning spaces?

A café is to be included as part of the proposals, which will be open to everyone, not just those working or studying at the Innovation Hub.

 

The campus will not be licensed and it is anticipated that there will be little evening activity on site, aside from specific industry events and student project launches.

Will this mean a reduction in the amount of parking for the Surrey Quays Leisure park?

No – the site does not form part of Surrey Quays Leisure Park and so won’t lead to a reduction in car parking for users of the Leisure Park.

Will the site be open to the public at all times?

The temporary innovation hub will be a publicly accessible space.

 

The main entrance will be open from mornings to evenings during normal operating hours. The main entrance gate will be locked outside of these times.

 

From time to time, the innovation hub may be open on weekends or late evenings up to 10pm for specific industry events and student project launches. Events would be held within the campus and contained behind the fence line.

How will security be managed on the site?

The temporary innovation hub will be a publicly accessible space. It is currently envisaged that it will be open from mornings until late evenings, in line with the operating hours for TEDI London.  The temporary innovation hub will be closed outside of these hours.

 

The innovation hub will be secured at all times, and security will be provide through external lighting and CCTV cameras. All secondary entrances, such as for servicing and emergency use, will be subject to access control.

 

British Land will continue to manage the site in its role as the landowner for the area. This management will balance the safety of all those using the space with creating a welcoming environment for all.

What local input will there be into how the public open spaces will be landscaped?

British Land is in discussions with Global Generation about partnering to deliver and manage the landscaping for the temporary innovation hub. Global Generation are an environmental educational charity that works with local schools to support young people to make a social and environmental difference by involving them in the co-creation of public spaces.

 

Global Generation would work with local groups and schools to create and maintain the green spaces at the temporary innovation hub.

How can I have my say on the plans?

British Land has submitted a standalone planning application to Southwark Council for the temporary innovation hub.

 

Southwark Council has allocated the planning application a case reference number of 20/AP/2482 and is now holding a period of statutory consultation period on the proposals between 29 September and 27 October.

 

The statutory consultation period is the opportunity for you to view all the planning documents and provide a formal comment directly to Southwark Council. Your comments will then be taken into consideration by Council in their determination of the planning application.

 

You can find all the application documents and make your formal comments on the application by visiting Southwark Council’s Planning Register at www.planning.southwark.gov.uk/online-applications/ using the case reference number 20/AP/2482.

 

We have also updated the innovation hub virtual exhibition (please visit cwm.exhibition.app) with further information about how you can view the planning documents, get in touch with the project team, or view frequently asked questions. From the exhibition, you can also continue to view the information about the proposals that was shared with the local community between 10 – 19 July 2020. If you would like to receive printed copies of the information available in the virtual exhibition please get in touch.

What is TEDI-London?

TEDI‑London is a new higher education provider co-founded by Arizona State University, King’s College London and University of New South Wales, Sydney. TEDI-London will deliver project-based learning in partnership with industry, with a focus on producing job-ready graduates.

 

TEDI-London is currently based at the Printworks on a time-limited basis. British Land have identified a nearby vacant car park as a suitable temporary location for TEDI-London for up to seven years.

 

TEDI-London plans to accept its first full-time cohort of students in September 2021 based at their new location in the temporary innovation hub offering degrees in global design engineering.

 

TEDI-London’s mission is to attract and empower individuals and partners from diverse backgrounds and perspectives with the skills and confidence to create innovative, real-world solutions that advance how people live as a global community.

 

To find out more about TEDI-London, please visit: www.tedi-london.ac.uk

Why has TEDI London chosen to establish itself at Canada Water?

Students of TEDI-London will learn mostly through practical project work, developed in partnership with industry. As an Opportunity Area that will see significant growth over the coming years, including an increase in the number of businesses settling in the area, Canada Water offers an opportunity for TEDI-London to strengthen its links with industry.

 

TEDI-London is already familiar with the area and has already run a successful summer school at the Printworks during summer 2019.

 

The TEDI-London team is keen to be an active member of the local community and is already in contact with various local stakeholders over potential projects and programmes that could be undertaken in the future. Please refer to this question for details.

How does TEDI London differ from other higher education providers?

TEDI-London will teach engineering differently. Students will learn through projects, co-designed and developed with industry partners.

Traditional lectures will be replaced with a technology enabled online ‘Learning Tree’ to develop the knowledge and skills needed to underpin the practical project work, and ultimately train specialist graduate design engineers.

These projects will be informed by real-life challenges, for example, the UN Sustainable Development Goals and Industry 4.0. The real life challenges of industry 4.0 requires future engineers to consider smart cities, affordable housing and AI, whilst also demanding an understanding of global drivers such as equality, health and wellbeing and climate change. The projects will be supported by one-to-one mentoring and group work developing essential career skills such as communication, problem-solving and teamwork.

The ‘Learning Tree’ is a networked system of three hour nodes which students work through at their own pace, driven by the technical knowledge requirements of the projects they work on.

How many students is TEDI London proposing to bring to the temporary Innovation Hub?

TEDI-London aims to start with 125 students in year one piloting the delivery of learning and teaching and managing student expectations.

 

TEDI-London then aims to grow steadily with a similar intake each year for the first five years.

 

There will be approximately 50 staff members, divided equally between academic and support services. It is expected that through an agile working policy, up to 50% of employees will work externally at any given time.

Will there be student accommodation on site?

The temporary innovation hub will be for teaching only and will not have any student accommodation on site.

Will TEDI London have a student union or bar?

A café is to be included as part of the proposals, but the campus will not be licensed and we anticipate there to be very little evening activity on site, aside from specific industry events and student project launches.

How will TEDI London benefit the local community?

Ensuring that TEDI-London is accessible to students in Southwark is central to TEDI-London’s mission to diversify the range of people studying engineering. There will be a bursary scheme for Southwark residents, and over the next year, TEDI London will work with local community groups and schools to plan a programme of outreach opportunities.

 

TEDI-London has just completed a six week online summer school programme where students from across the world were tasked to develop dementia-friendly solutions for the new town centre. TEDI-London is now running a free three week online taster programme open from 27 July – 14 August. Local residents are encouraged to apply and help design ideas for a colour and light installation for Canada Water.

 

Please visit TEDI-London’s website for more details.

When will construction works start and how long will they last for?

If the planning application is granted by Southwark Council, construction works could start towards the end of this year.

 

The project will be brought forward in phases. The first phase of construction of the Temporary Innovation Hub will see the creation a new temporary building on the corner of Quebec Way and Toredo Street to house the first cohort of TEDI-London students.

 

As student numbers increase, or other interim facilities associated with the Canada Water Masterplan, further buildings will be constructed, either separately or together, depending on requirement. These will be constructed off site and brought to development to minimise disruption to the ongoing learning in phase one and the surrounding neighbourhood.

What is modular construction?

Modular construction is when the majority of a building is assembled off site, before being brought on site to be put together.

 

Future modification and adaptation of a building is also easier when built by modular construction, which in turn helps extend the working life of structures as modules can be reused beyond their initial use. Other benefits of modular construction include increased productivity and reduced waste. Vehicle traffic transporting materials to and from site is also minimised, which in turn minimises impact on neighbours.

How will the impacts of construction be minimised?

The temporary hub will be built using modular construction techniques, with the majority of the hub built off site and then put in place on site. This will make the onsite construction quicker, thereby reducing construction impact on neighbours.

Further to this, British Land is also not proposing to build the entire hub at once and instead will be delivering it in stages over the next four-five years to accommodate rising student numbers and the growth of the facilities other associated uses.

 

That said, British Land is aware that building works create disturbances for neighbours and endeavour to reduce these impacts as far as possible. British Land is committed to being a considered neighbour during the construction process and already has a proven track record with 28 National Site Awards for its highly considerate work.

 

The appointed contractor will be a member of the Considerate Constructors scheme, meaning that it will adhere to a strict code of practice. As part of the Considerate Constructors Scheme, British Land and its contractor will prepare a community communications plan that establishes the communication protocols and how they will keep local residents informed about ongoing project updates and how to get in touch if any issues arise.

 

In addition, a construction liaison group will be established which will meet regularly. Contractors will attend these groups to share programme updates and address any questions or concerns that neighbours may experience through the construction process.

 

British Land will also produce a detailed Construction Management Plan, which will be available for people to view on the Council’s planning portal and will set out, amongst others things, the restricted hours during which construction will take place.

How will construction vehicles access to the site?

The site will be accessed via Quebec Way, and all heavy goods vehicles associated with these works will access Quebec Way via Redriff Road rather than Canada Street, to reduce impact on Alfred Salter Primary School.

 

A site-specific Construction Management Plan for delivering the substation on Zone L will be submitted as part of the Reserved Matters Planning Application that will confirm these arrangements, and we will share the planning application with the local community once submitted.

7.4 PROJECT HUB AT FORMER DOCK OFFICE
What are the proposals for the Project Hub?

British Land has submitted a planning application and Listed Building Consent application for the Former Dock Manager’s Offices to carry out internal and external refurbishment works to preserve them as a Grade II listed heritage asset, and to provide a new Project Hub for the Canada Water Masterplan to oversee the regeneration of Canada Water into a new town centre for the local area.

 

The proposed refurbishment works include repairing damaged brickwork, repairs to structural cracks, cleaning of the façade and maintenance to the clock tower. In addition, the large modern signage on the principal building façade, which is inconsistent with the aesthetic of the former Dock Offices signage, will be removed.

 

Internal restoration works include redesigning existing lighting to better reveal the significant architectural features of the building, and restoring existing woodwork. All restoration works will be carried out in line with the building’s listed status.

 

British Land also intends to refurbish some of the Dock office space bordering Surrey Quays Road to provide a Canada Water Masterplan Project Hub. The Hub will contain a flexible exhibition and event space, as well as office space for Canada Water Masterplan project staff. The Project Hub will be located in the office space which formerly housed London College of International Business Studies, which has moved elsewhere in the Borough. The planning application that has been submitted to Southwark Council, which is outside the Canada Water Masterplan permission 18/AP/1604, also proposes to change the land use of this space from Educational to Commercial use (Class D1 to E).

What is the timeline for the delivery of the Project Hub?

British Land has submitted a planning application to Southwark Council for the new Project Hub and refurbishment works.

 

Subject to planning permission being granted, the works will take place during Autumn and Winter 2020.

What consultation is taking place for this application?

Southwark Council is holding a 28-day statutory consultation period on the proposals between Friday 4 September and Friday 2 October.

It has allocated the planning application to enable delivery of the project hub and listed building consent for refurbishment works the case reference numbers of 20/AP/2466 and 20/AP/2467 respectively.

 

The statutory consultation period is the opportunity for you to view all the planning documents and provide a formal comment directly to Southwark Council. Your comments will then be taken into consideration by Council in their determination of the planning application.

 

You can find all the application documents and make your formal comments on the application by visiting Southwark Council’s Planning Register at www.planning.southwark.gov.uk/online-applications/ using the case reference numbers 20/AP/2466 and 20/AP/2467.

 

For further details about the proposed restoration works and change of use planning application to enable delivery of the new Project Hub, please see the Planning Application Cover Letter that was submitted as part of the planning application.

What is happening to the businesses that currently exist in the Dock Office building?

The London College of International Business Studies has moved elsewhere in the Borough. This office space will be used to accommodate the new Project Hub.

The status of all other tenants within the building will remain unchangedas a result of these proposals.